Gateway to Northwestern Ontario Digital Collections
C.N.R. Conductors' Hats
Description
Media Type
Image
Item Type
Photographs
Description
The conductor's job was to punch tickets of passengers with his personalized punch. A conductor could recognize a punch in the ticket and know if it was valid. At his retirement, the conductor would be presented with his punch as a reward and memento of his years of service. The sleeping car conductor would handle the on-board reservations for booths and roomettes. He supervised the sleeping car staff, who pulled down and secured the booths each evening, and supplied the passengers with fresh linens and towels. An extra amenity was the cubicle found in every roomette where passengers would put their shoes every night. The following morning, they would shine.

Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 48.71664 Longitude: -94.56711
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Rainy River Public Library
Email:libraryrr@gmail.com
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

334 4th St.

PO Box 308

Rainy River, ON

P0W 1L0

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C.N.R. Conductors' Hats


The conductor's job was to punch tickets of passengers with his personalized punch. A conductor could recognize a punch in the ticket and know if it was valid. At his retirement, the conductor would be presented with his punch as a reward and memento of his years of service. The sleeping car conductor would handle the on-board reservations for booths and roomettes. He supervised the sleeping car staff, who pulled down and secured the booths each evening, and supplied the passengers with fresh linens and towels. An extra amenity was the cubicle found in every roomette where passengers would put their shoes every night. The following morning, they would shine.