Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, September 9, 1939
:
Description
Creators
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on September 9, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the economic effects of the war, the potential conscription of his sons, and the publications of his new book.
Notes
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Date of Original
September 9, 1939
Dimensions
Width: 21 cm
Height: 28 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
RG-102.13_1.41.34
Collection
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

{Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada

Rev. J. Reble, President

104 Hughson St. Hamilton, Ont.

Rev. C.R. Cronmiller, Vice-President

Williamsburg, Ont.

Rev. H.R. Mosig, German Secretary

New Hamburg, Ont.

Rev. C. H. Little, S.T.D., English Sec'y

170 Albert Street, Waterloo, Ont.

Rev. E. Holm, Treasurer

Conestogo, Ont.}

Sept. 9, 1939.

Dear Mother:

Of the writing of letters there seems to be no end. This is the fifth letter that I have written to-day, i.e., when I have got it done. The weather here has been quite fall-like all this week, there being near frosts almost every night. Still we have had no fire in our furnace, and with the war on, there probably will be none as long as we can stand the cold, as everybody will be trying to save coal. Prices of everything are going up by leaps and bounds and limitations on amounts purchased are being made. For example, we are not allowed to purchase more than two pounds of sugar at a time in spite of the fact that sugar has long been a glut on the market. Eggs and everything that you eat have advanced in price, and we are beginning to feel the pinch of things in the big bills that we are rolling up, especially when no money is coming in with which to pay them. The storekeepers are on the alert to take advantage of the situation, and the purchaser pays the piper. Carolus had an offer the other day of the position of quarter master in the army with assurance that his place in the Mutual would be held open for him on his return from the army when the war is over. I haven’t seen him since he received this offer and don’t know that he intends to do about it, butI would advise him to take it, as it would involve very little personal danger. Conscription has not as yet been passed by our House of Commons at Ottawa, but it is certain that it is only a question of time when this will be done, as the war promises to be an extended one. And if Carolus

(page 2)

waits to be conscripted, he will be in line for the trenches and nothing else. Herman says if he had such an offer, he would snap it up without hesitation, and that is the way I feel about it. It is altigether too bad that we are in such a predicament, but it seems that the nations are incapable of learning by experience and will have to suffer what they bring upon themselves by their evil doings. I am inclosing a few stamps which Pearl may be able to make use of. I received a letter to-day from Dr. Neudoerffer to whom when he was here last summer I gave my manuscript on NEW TESTAMENT HANDBOOK with a view to its publication in India. He writes me that manuscript is now in the press and will be out in about a month from Aug. 22nd. He will thensend me 50 copies for my own use and disposal, will keep 30 copies for himself to use in his seminary, and will put the rest in stock to be drawn upon by himself and myself as the need may arise. The book is particularly for use in seminaries, but also sufficiently popular in style for general use. It will be about twice the size of my former book. The beauty about the whole thing is that it doesn’t cost either me or Neudoerffer a cent, as he induced the Board of Foreign Missions to stand the cost of publication. So if I can sell my fifty copies or more, I ought to make a little money out of it. This was indeed good news coming as it did to-day, our thirty-first wedding anniversay. I also received to-day notification of anniversary celebrations of two churches in my first parish in Nova Scotia, and I at once wrote them greetings to be read on those occasions. Robert left us on Monday afternoon and returned to his work in faraway Noranda. Botha Bonnie and I write to him regularly every week at different time, so that he gets two letters from home every week, which keep him informed and help to keep his spirits up. Arthur has preached every Sunday

(page 3)

since his return, but has no appointment for to-morrow. I hope that he will soon get a call from some parish and be ordained. Otherwise he will undoubtedly be conscripted as soon as conscription is imposed in Canada. His German, I fear, will not be of much service to him as far as preaching goes, as the churches are cutting out the German very rapidly now. St. John’s will hold its last German service to-morrow morning, and all the other churches in the Twin-City have already cut out theirs, deeming prudence the best policy under the present situation. It may be, however, that German services will be continued in the west, where the German is far more necessary, and he may get a call from there, although I haven’t heard from Rev, Weidenhammer as yet. Our Seminary will open a week from Monday and the College on the following day, but I doubt whether we will get enough students to remedy the financial situation materially, and I am looking for still harder times ahead, though I hope and pray that I may be disappointed. I wrote quite a few articles for our church paper during the vacation that is now nearly over, and a couple of them are still to come out yet. Bonnie received Mabel’s nice letter early in the week and intends to reply as soon as her hands are free enough from housework and canning and innumerable other things to hold a pen in her hand. We send you all our greetings and best wishes for health and happiness. I am still taking my daily swim as usual, and at this date have only one competitor, a Scotchman who takes care of the Post Office; and being a Scotchman

(page 4)

I don’t think he goes in on Sunday. So I think I will have all the dam to myself to-morrow morning. I still have a game of horseshoe for exercise and enjoyment with one of my neighbours, a Mr. Tripp. He is very good at the game and generally heats me, but I sometimes give him a close run, as e.g. to-day, when the final score was 25 to 24 in his favour. Well, I think I will stop here and leave a little news for the rest of them to tell.My friend Rev. Schmidt of Buffalo paid me a brief visit one night this week on his return home from his vacation spent in a cottage up on Lake Huron. He is a fine fellow and never fails to give me a call and a cigar or so. With love and all good wishes, I am as ever,

Devotedly yours,

[signed] Carroll

P.S. I am to preach at the Joint Church Council men’s convention of the Kitchener-Stratford District at Baden to-morrow night. Herman is going to drive me out there. It is only about twelve miles away.

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, September 9, 1939


Typewritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on September 9, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the economic effects of the war, the potential conscription of his sons, and the publications of his new book.