Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, August 27, 1939
:
Description
Creators
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on August 27, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, the possibility of another world war, and his children.
Notes
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.
Date of Original
August 27, 1939
Dimensions
Width: 21 cm
Height: 28 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
RG-102.13_1.41.32
Collection
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

{Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada

Rev. J. Reble, President

104 Hughson St. Hamilton, Ont.

Rev. C.R. Cronmiller, Vice-President

Williamsburg, Ont.

Rev. H.R. Mosig, German Secretary

New Hamburg, Ont.

Rev. C. H. Little, S.T.D., English Sec'y

170 Albert Street, Waterloo, Ont.

Rev. E. Holm, Treasurer

Conestogo, Ont.

August 27, 1939.}

Dear Mother:

Having this morning taken my 160th swim across the lake and back and having gone to early church and being now back in my little study and having a long time to wait for dinner, I thought I might as well fill in the gap, as best I may, by typing my weekly letter to you. The weather this morning is just what the slangy young generation of our day would call "scrumptious": the sky is bright under the glowing rays of the sun, the air is cool, and only the tiniest breeze is blowing. It is the intermediate passing stage that foretokens the approach of fall and the coming of the frosts and snows and storms that will shortly follow its advent. It is also a reminder that the idle days are almost over and that soon we will be taking up again our daily occupation. This latter, however, doesn’t bother me very much, as I am getting tired of loafing. Of course, I find something in which to put in my time in reading books and in writing articles for our Church paper, and in various lines of study. I just finished during the past week, e.g. , the reading of the Greek N.T. through for the 52nd time, the English O.T. for the 28th time, and the English N.T. for the 474th time. But don't think for a moment that I am boasting over this accomplishment: I have done no more than it was my duty to do. During the past week we have past through a rather strenuous, nerve-wracking period as far as the world-situation goes. It didn't bother me much, but Bonnies was quite wrought up with her head up in the air and her ears constantly directed to the radio. As a matter of fact, the

(page 2)

thing isn't settled yet, and there may be world war breaking out at any moment. I haven't been wrought up, because there is nothing that I can do about it; and if the nationshave so far lost their sanity, after their experience in the last world war, that they are ready to go at it again and destroy what is left of civilisation, there is nothing short of divine power that can stop them. The British policy of interference in European continental affairs is responsible for the flare-up. If England had not encouraged the Poles and made a hard and fast treaty with them, the trouble would have been over long ere this. And England or any other country that wants to dominate or police the continent of Europe will always find plenty of trouble. The whole situation is the result and offshoot of the unfair treaty of Versailles, which I expected to culminate sooner or later, but which has come more rapidly than I anticipated. Of course, if it comes to war, Canada will be in it to the hilt, and I have at least three boys of military age, who will in all likelihood be draughted into the service. I personally don't think the whole country of Poland is worth deluging the whole western world in war - a war that will destroy all that is best in civilisation.But the powers that be have the matter in their own hands, and can and will do as they please. I am writing this now, so that you may know how I stand in this matter. My own view about war in general is that no nation is justified in going to war save in its own defense. I am not going to write any more along this line, either now or hereafter. If war breaks out censorship of all letters will again occur, and one will have to keep very "mum" to stay out of trouble or concentration camps. Then we will have no more liberty than the Nazi or Fascist countries have, but can do only as we are told. But thank God, it hasn’t come to that stage yet. And I hope, in any case, the United States in spite of Roosevelt will have sense enough to stay out of the conflict. Arthur is kept busy preaching these

(page 3)

days. Last Sunday he preached inConestogo and Bridgeport, and to-day he is preaching in German in New Dundee and Mannheim. I have not heard him in German as yet, but I have no doubt he will acquit himself with credit, as he seems to have a special talent for languages. Tell Mabel, if she is at home that we received and enjoyed her letters, postcards, etc, and that we all trust she had a grand time at the World's Fair in New York. This reminds me that Bonnie and the three little girls intend taking in the Toronto Exhibition one day this week. Frederick intended to go with them, but has decided to stay home and keep his father company. It will be a tiresome day for Bonnie, and she has no great desire to go, but thinks she ought to give the "kids" or "nanny goats" and outing. Eileen went down with me to church this morning, but didn't come back with me. Just as we got outside of the church a fellow drove up in a big black car and stopped, and Eileen turned to me and said Goodbye, and rushed in.Tell Mabel that she, i.e. Eileen, is just as boy-crazy as ever. She hasn't lined up with any one as a special yet; but her favourite one at present is a "Donkey" (Duncke).

Ruth is still over at Mrs. Berdux's keeping house and company for her. She is a great cook and housekeeper, and Mrs. Berdux appears to be quite happy with her and satisfied with her attentions. We are expecting Roberta home around Labour Day. He is going to try to get an extra day off, so that he can stay home that much longer. We hear from him regularly every week. But here I must stop, With lots of love and all good wishes, I am

(signed) Most Sincerely Yours, Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, August 27, 1939


Typewritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on August 27, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, the possibility of another world war, and his children.