Letters from C. H. Little to Candace Little, August 6, 1939
:
Description
Creators
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letters from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on August 6, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses Mabel`s visit, Arthur`s return from Germany, and a birth in the family.
Notes
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Reese Foegele in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original
August 6, 1939
Dimensions
Width: 21 cm
Height: 28 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
RG-102.13_1.41.30
Collection
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

{Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada

Rev. J. Reble, President

104 Hughson St. Hamilton, Ont.

Rev. C.R. Cronmiller, Vice-President

Williamsburg, Ont.

Rev. H.R. Mosig, German Secretary

New Hamburg, Ont.

Rev. C. H. Little, S.T.D., English Sec'y

170 Albert Street, Waterloo, Ont.

Rev. E. Holm, Treasurer

Conestogo, Ont.

August 6, 1939.}

Dear Mother:

Having just got back from early church (German), where I took Mabel this morning, I will see what I can do in the way of a letter to you. Mabel went with me down to church this morning, not religiously or devotionally, but out ofpure feminine curiosity. She wanted to see and hear what a German service rom "a" to "izzard" was like; and all she got out of it was the Amen and a few conjunctions like "und" and "aber", and a preposition or two. But she didn’t think I got much more out of it than she did, as she was sure that I was asleep most of the time. The only thing that made her a bit dubious about it was, that I always rose promptly when the time for rising came around and she didn’t have to punch me to wake me up. We met Mabel at Hamilton yesterday in the Hamilton station where she spent a couple comfortable and happy hours and had a good rest and an equally good lunch. The station there is new and modern, and is at this time of theyear probably the coolest place in Canada. So we figured that her rather long wait did her a pile of good. Anyway she was sufficiently rested from the long trip to talk a blue streak all the way back to Waterloo, and kept us entertained better than a "movie". We all think that Mabel is looking remarkably well and is holding back her years wonderfully. On the other hand she thought I was looking pretty good too. Mabel is going down to church again thi s morning, this time religiously and devotionally. She is driving

(page 2)

down to St. Mark's, where the pastor is going to preach on "Marriage and Divorce", although Mabel declares that she is not interested in either one of them; but having been to church once this morning and now going again makes her actions somewhat belie her words. Her only alibi here is, that Herman persuaded her to accompany him and she wasn't rude enough to refuse. Believe it or not: that's up to you: I am offering no solution to the problem. We were all glad to hear the good report she brought of you.May you live long and prosper! We have a remarkable old man up here in Ontario, in Toronto, who is past 96 and is still going strong. He went to London, Ont. last week and delivered an address before the Rotary Club convention. Dr. Clausen was there and heard him and said he delivered his speech with vigour. He held heavy insurance in the Life Insurance Companies of Canada. They have a ruling that a man at 96 is supposed to be dead. So when he reached that age they paid him his insurance in full and took his name off their lists. Sir William has held the office of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and has been lieytenant Governor of Ontario, and has held many prominent official positions. He attributes his extreme longevity to alcoholic preservation. He was never known to be drunk, but has for the best part of his life drunk two quarts of hard liquor a day. Carolus who saw him recently says he is smooth of skin and has scarcely a wrinkle, and that he looks like a well preserved mummy. The Clausens, the Schortens, and the Creagers are all back from their vacations. So the hill is showing some signs of life again. Dr. Schorten's married daughter, Mrs. Motheral, came back with him. So both sides of this big house have company at one and the same time. Eileen

(page 3)

got ahead of me and told you the big Little news; but I will still have to put my ear on that score. We haven't seen the baby yet, but maybe we will see him to-day. They say he is much more shapely and better looking than the other fellow, which is as it should be, seeing that practice makes perfect. The remarkable thing about him is his name. They are going to call him Frederick: so there will be two Frederick Littles in town, and two even in their own family, seeing that Carl's second name is Frederick. Then they gave him the surname Clausen and had to give him my surname: so that he is at the same time Frederick Clausen and Frederick Little. Figure all that out if you can. Both mother and baby, they say, are doing well and coming along fine. Bonnie had the house put in spick and span order in honour of Mabel's arrival and to make a good impression upon her, which it did. She was also very much taken with Bonnie's biscuits and bread, and thinks she will regain her lost weight during the time she is feasting with us. We don't have much money, but we do have good food if I do say it myself, who hadn't ought to. The weather is fine with a cool breeze blowing with vigour to-day. We are expecting Arthur to arrive now most any time. If he left England on the 29th ult as he expected, he should be here by to-morrow evening. With all good wishes and love, I am,

Most sincerely yours,

(signed) Carroll

(page 4)

{Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Canada

Rev. J. Reble, President

104 Hughson St. Hamilton, Ont.

Rev. C.R. Cronmiller, Vice-President

Williamsburg, Ont.

Rev. H.R. Mosig, German Secretary

New Hamburg, Ont.

Rev. C. H. Little, S.T.D., English Sec'y

170 Albert Street, Waterloo, Ont.

Rev. E. Holm, Treasurer

Conestogo, Ont.

August 6, 1939.}

Dear Mother:

It is rainy to-day and no chance to play horseshoe, so I thought I might as well play the typewriter and get my letter, such as it is, off to you. Mabel is still with us , but is leaving to-morrow morning. It is needless to say that we enjoyed her visit very much, and found her sufficiently talkative to be entertaining, which lightened our own burden considerably, as it is always easier to be entertained than to entertain. Bonnie cooked such good mealsthat Mabel thinks she has gained considerably in weight and when she gets back will have to begin fasting or reducing again. It will not be necessary to say anything more about her, as she no doubt will give you a full account when she gets back home. Yesterday or the day before I received a very fine note fromMrs. Luda Crouse Moser in reply to my little note of sympathy sent her sometime ago. If any of you should see her at church or elsewhere tell her how much I appreciated it. All the family and Mabel, when they read it thought it was wonderful. Arthur arrived back safe and sound from Germany on Monday evening and has been with us ever since. As he has no girl as yet, he doesn't go out much. He brought every member of the family a gift of one kind or another. He gave Herman and me each a beer stein, which was quite appropriate, the only drawback being that I have nothing to put in mine. Herman's stein is a ghastly thing, being in the form of a human skull, with eyes out and all teeth showing. That was no doubt an impled caution not to drink too much beer in view of what it

(page 5)

might eventually result in. He brought his mother a beautiful diamond engagement ring, of which she is very proud, as she has been clamoring for such a ring ever since she lost the puny little diamond out of the ring I gave her years and years ago. This last statement is ambiguous, but that is unessential as it applies both to the time of giving and the time of losing, which weren't so far apart. Arthur also brought back a bust of the head of Martin Luther, done in clay by an artist and moulded lifesize from the death mask of Luther. This sells ordinarily over there for some thirty-odd dollars, but arthur got it for around ten. It now sits in our living room on the top of our radio, where it presents a very fine effect. Arthur's birthday, the 26th, I believe, falls on the 20th of this month. In honour of the occasion I asked him to take one of my sermons at Galt-Hespeler next Sunday, which he consented to do. In that way I will be able to pay him his birthday dollar. This is how I plan to work it: I will first take the dollar out of the proceeds; then I will divide the balance between him and me. I don't see how anybody could find fault with so fair a proposition. Carolus' new baby is coming along fine, and so is his mother, who expects to leave the hospital to-day and spend a week or so recuperating before she resumes keeping house in her own home. It may interest you to know that the baby, Mrs. Clausen says, looks just like me. You may feel sorry for the baby; but as the other one looks like Dr. Clausen, it is only fair that this one should resemble his paternal grandfather. Special examinations for failures in the finals begin in the College this week - a sign that our vacation period is fast approaching its end. Glad to hear through Pearl that Jennie Lee is safe at home again and that you are progressing so nicely. As Mabel is inclosing a note and you will be getting an extra letter, I will close right here and now. With love and all good wishes, Sincerely, (signed) Carroll

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Letters from C. H. Little to Candace Little, August 6, 1939


Typewritten letters from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on August 6, 1939. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses Mabel`s visit, Arthur`s return from Germany, and a birth in the family.