Letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to N. W. Rowell, January 22, 1926
Description
Creators
King, William Lyon Mackenzie, Author
Rowell, N. W.
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to N. W. Rowell, Liberal Party member and former MPP, on January 22, 1926. King thanks Rowell for his letter, which he read aloud to his government.

Signature in black ink by William Lyon Mackenzie King
Notes
Embossed Prime Ministers Office Canada at top of page
Watermark on pages - Chaldean Vellum


William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) was Canada's longest serving Prime Minister with a total of 22 years (1921-1930 and 1935-1948). King was born in Berlin, Ontario (present day Kitchener) on December 17, 1874. He graduated from the University of Toronto and went on to study economics at Harvard and Chicago University. In 1900 King was named Canada's first Deputy Minister of Labour, and became Minister of Labour in 1909. In 1921 King was elected Prime Minster of Canada. King was a member of the Liberal Party of Parliament for over 30 years, 22 of those years were spent as Prime Minister of Canada. William Lyon Mackenzie King died on July 22, 1950 in Kingsmere, Quebec.

Newton Wesley Rowell (1867-1941) was born in Avra, Ontario on November 1, 1867. Rowell was leader of the Ontario Liberal Party from 1911 to 1917 but moved to the Unionist government as a result of the Conscription Crisis in 1917. Rowell left his positions with the government in 1921 in lieu of other opportunities. He retired in 1938 due to his failing health. Rowell died in Toronto, Ontario on November 22, 1941.

Transcribed by Danielle Hughes in 2017.
Date of Original
Jan. 22, 1926
Dimensions
Width: 20.3 cm
Height: 25 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
S718_6.3
Collection
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 45.42094 Longitude: -75.69029
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
S718 Disc 1
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Private and Confidential

Ottawa, January 22, 1926

Honourable N. W. Rowell, K. C. ,

38 King Street, West,

Toronto, Ontario.

Dear Mr. Rowell:

No communication could have been more welcome than your letter of January 11. I took the liberty of reading it aloud to the members of the Government, all of whom I found were quite prepared to go the length of taking in two or three members of the Progressive Party as Ministers, should the Progressive Party be prepared, as such, to share full responsibility with us for our legislative and administrative acts.

On Friday last, following the vote of a week ago last night, I sent for Mr. Forke and asked him to tell the members of his Party that the Government was prepared to discuss an arrangement of the kind with a representative committee of their number. This committee was named and met a committee of my colleagues and myself on Monday night last. With the exception of Mr. Forke all were opposed to a coalition.

(page 2)

They were not prepared to go further than to consider the working out of a legislative programme with respect to which they would undertake openly to co-operate in parliament. Negotiations looking to co-operation on a legislative programme have since continued and are still in progress. At the moment the outlook is distinctly hopeful as there is little in disagreement between us. The Speech from the Throne appears to have met with general approval in their ranks, as well as our own, and it will be on the basis of legislation there proposed that co-operation will be effected.

Personally I should have preferred coalition along the lines of the arrangement effected by Bruce with Page in Australia. This was what Dafoe also favoured most strongly, and with my whole-hearted approval he has quietly seen a number of Progressives in the hope of gaining their support for an arrangement of the kind. Having been confined to the house with a heavy cold during the past few days, I have not learned what his present view is, but from what I learn from other sources I gather that he has found that in their determination not to have any of their number enter the Cabinet as representatives of the Party, the majority of the Progressives are adamant.

(page 3)

With an exception or two there appears to be the best of feeling between most of the Progressives and ourselves. Such co-operative arrangement as it may be possible to work out will, I expect, be concluded before the vote takes place on the present amendment to the Address in reply to the Speech from the Throne. If the outcome is such as to gain for the Government the united support of the Progressive Party at that time, you may, I think, assume the arrangement come to will serve to enable the work of the present session to proceed in an orderly and substantial way. Working together for a few months may lead to a closer association at a later date. This, at least, is the view at present being expressed.

With kindest regards,

Yours very sincerely,

[signed] W.L.Mackenzie King

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to N. W. Rowell, January 22, 1926


Typewritten letter from William Lyon Mackenzie King to N. W. Rowell, Liberal Party member and former MPP, on January 22, 1926. King thanks Rowell for his letter, which he read aloud to his government.

Signature in black ink by William Lyon Mackenzie King