Letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King, September 11, 1946
Description
Creators
King, William Lyon Mackenzie, Recipient
Bezeau, C. Mortimer
, Author
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King on September 11, 1946. Bezeau shares his comments on David Croll, member of Provincial Parliament, and the Stelco strike.
Notes
William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) was Canada's longest serving Prime Minister with a total of 22 years (1921-1930 and 1935-1948). King was born in Berlin, Ontario (present day Kitchener) on December 17, 1874. He graduated from the University of Toronto and went on to study economics at Harvard and Chicago University. In 1900 King was named Canada's first Deputy Minister of Labour, and became Minister of Labour in 1909. In 1921 King was elected Prime Minster of Canada. King was a member of the Liberal Party of Parliament for over 30 years, 22 of those years were spent as Prime Minister of Canada. William Lyon Mackenzie King died on July 22, 1950 in Kingsmere, Quebec.

C. Mortimer Bezeau (1871-1964) was a politician in Kitchener, Ontario and a long-standing member of the Liberal Party. He held positions in local government in 1925-1926 and 1928, and was mayor of Kitchener from 1931-1932. Bezeau made many contributions to the 'Letter to the Editor' portions of The Globe and Mail regarding various political matters and opinions. C. Mortimer Bezeau died in 1964 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, Ontario.

Throughout William Lyon Mackenzie King's career the two men corresponded via typed or handwritten letters and exchanged gifts.

Transcribed by Danielle Hughes in 2017.
Date of Original
Sept. 11, 1946
Dimensions
Width: 21.4 cm
Height: 27.6 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
S718_1.2.73
Collection
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4501 Longitude: -80.48299
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
S718 Disc 1
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

September 11, 1946

Right Honourable W.L.Mackenzie King.

Ottawa, Canada.

Dear Mr. King:-

Our mutual friend, David Croll, is quoted in a morning paper as saying in a speech last night: "The Canadian people demand that negotiations continue with a view to settlement of the strike…..All that is needed is a little more patience."

I am wondering on what authority Dave made that assertion. The people with whom I come in contact, and whose sympathies are for the most part with labor, are beginning to wonder if the Government knows when patience ceases to be a virtue. The steel strike, as presently conducted, is not in the interest of the workers; but rather to save the face and show the power of a few labor leaders.

During the seaman's strike a few months ago one of the leaders is reported to have said: "When shipowners can dictate to the Government, then the shipowners become the Government." By the same token labor leaders can become the Government.

Some of us are beginning to wonder why such men as are leading the steel strike can, with impunity, flout the law, defy the Government and incite to insurrection, while minor offenders are fined or sent to jail.

In my humble opinion the time has come to end the strike by giving protection to the men who are obeying the law within the Stelco plant. The time for "patience" has ended; the time for courage is long overdue. Had the law been rigorously enforced with the first defiant speech of Millard and the first evidence of unlawful picketing at the plant the present situation would not have developed. Each evidence of Governmental weakness gave encouragement to the law violators in Hamilton not only, but also in Kitchener. If there is any further immunity granted the law violators at the expense of the law-abiding citizens within the Stelco plant I dread to contemplate the future of both labor and industry in Canada.

With kindest personal regards, I remain as ever,

Your sincere friend,

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Letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King, September 11, 1946


Typewritten letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King on September 11, 1946. Bezeau shares his comments on David Croll, member of Provincial Parliament, and the Stelco strike.