Letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King, February 4, 1935
Description
Creators
King, William Lyon Mackenzie, Recipient
Bezeau, C. Mortimer
, Author
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Correspondence
Description
Typewritten letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King on February 4, 1935. Bezeau sends King clippings from the Kitchener Daily Record, and tells King of his dissatisfaction with the Tory government.
Notes
William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) was Canada's longest serving Prime Minister with a total of 22 years (1921-1930 and 1935-1948). King was born in Berlin, Ontario (present day Kitchener) on December 17, 1874. He graduated from the University of Toronto and went on to study economics at Harvard and Chicago University. In 1900 King was named Canada's first Deputy Minister of Labour, and became Minister of Labour in 1909. In 1921 King was elected Prime Minster of Canada. King was a member of the Liberal Party of Parliament for over 30 years, 22 of those years were spent as Prime Minister of Canada. William Lyon Mackenzie King died on July 22, 1950 in Kingsmere, Quebec.

C. Mortimer Bezeau (1871-1964) was a politician in Kitchener, Ontario and a long-standing member of the Liberal Party. He held positions in local government in 1925-1926 and 1928, and was mayor of Kitchener from 1931-1932. Bezeau made many contributions to the 'Letter to the Editor' portions of The Globe and Mail regarding various political matters and opinions. C. Mortimer Bezeau died in 1964 and is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Kitchener, Ontario.

Throughout William Lyon Mackenzie King's career the two men corresponded via typed or handwritten letters and exchanged gifts.

Transcribed by Danielle Hughes in 2017.
Date of Original
Feb. 4, 1935
Dimensions
Width: 21.5 cm
Height: 27.6 cm
Subject(s)
Local identifier
S718_1.2.28
Collection
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4501 Longitude: -80.48299
Copyright Statement
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation
William Lyon Mackenzie King collection, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes
S718 Disc 1
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email:libarch@wlu.ca
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

February 4, 1935

Right Hon. W.L.M.King,

Laurier House

Ottawa, Ontario.

Dear Mr. King:-

I am taking the liberty of handing you herewith a series of letters published in the Kithener Daily Record a few month ago.

You will recall that the subject of these letters received some consideration during one of my visits to Laurier House about three years ago; and at that time I agreed with you that the time was not yet ripe to make the views which I then held a matter of practical politics. Today the situation has changed; and I believe the time has come when only the most far-reaching proposals can save the Liberal Party; and these proposals must be enacted into practical legislation to save the country.

Not now to discuss the Prime Minister’s insincerity; nor the futility of his efforts to “blast” his way through the constitution to the accomplishment of his expressed purpose; but the question raised by Harry Anderson of THE GLOBE as to whether “The people are more concerned with past promises than with present performances” is worthy of some consideration. The fact is that the Prime Minister has made certain proposals which, to many, may look like performances; and these proposals, futile though they may be to accomplish any good purpose may, in a measure, stem the tide that was fast moving against the present government.

The proposals set forth in the letters herewith submitted for your consideration were pretty generally accepted as sound at the time they were published; although John Walter, writing over the pen name of J.RETLAW, offered some opposition to them; but this opposition was inspired by the fact that Walter hoped to be the C.C.F. candidate in the next election, and further thought that the writer might entertain similar aspirations with regard to the Liberal nomination.

There is nothing in the Prime Minister’s proposals that will benefit the unemployed of today; and nothing that will benefit those now employed unless conditions become so much worse that those now employed will, within the next twelve months, be forced to join the ranks of the unemployed.

(page 2)

Hon. W.L.M.King

In submitting these letters to you I do so from a sense of loyalty to yourself and to the party which you so ably lead, a loyalty that has increased with the passing years; and a desire to be of some little service in helping to solve the problems with which the Liberal Party is confronted.

I should be glad to have the file returned after you are through with the letters.

With kindest personal regards, and every good wish for your success in combating the most unscrupulous of politicians that has reigned in Ottawa during my time,

I ramain,

Your sincere friend.

C.Mortimer Bezeau.

P.S.

I should be glad to receive a Hansard report of any speech you may deliver on the Government’s Social Reform proposals.

C.M.B

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Letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King, February 4, 1935


Typewritten letter from C. Mortimer Bezeau to William Lyon Mackenzie King on February 4, 1935. Bezeau sends King clippings from the Kitchener Daily Record, and tells King of his dissatisfaction with the Tory government.