1812 History
Military Gorget
Description
Sponsors
1812 History
Department of Canadian Heritage This item is a part of the 1812 History digitization project. This project was made possible with the support of the Department of Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Culture Online Strategy.
Media Type
Object
Description
This copper gorget, dated 1796 to 1815, was worn by British officers as a decorative piece to signify rank. It is crescent shaped with a beaded rim and contains the cipher “GR”, which is enclosed in laurels and mounted under a Hanoverian crown.

Gorgets were worn around the neck, below the collar and were held in place by ribbon and rosettes. The gorget may be said to have been the last surviving piece of plate armour used in the British Army, with the exception of the cuirass, or breast and back plates, of the Household Cavalry. By 1684, the gorget was worn only by Officers and had become a badge of rank worn only when on duty. From 1743, gorgets were either gilt or silver, depending on the lace and buttons of the uniform. Gorgets were abolished by General Order No. 492, dated 2nd August, 1830.
Subject(s)
Local identifier
971.204
Geographic Coverage
Recommended Citation
Image courtesy of the Niagara Historical Society & Museum
Terms of Use
Please contact the Niagara Historical Society & Museum for any reproductions of this image.
Contact
Niagara Historical Society Museum
Email:contact@niagarahistorical.museum
Website:
Agency street/mail address:

43 Castlereagh Street

P.O. Box 208

Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON

L0S 1J0

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Military Gorget


This copper gorget, dated 1796 to 1815, was worn by British officers as a decorative piece to signify rank. It is crescent shaped with a beaded rim and contains the cipher “GR”, which is enclosed in laurels and mounted under a Hanoverian crown.

Gorgets were worn around the neck, below the collar and were held in place by ribbon and rosettes. The gorget may be said to have been the last surviving piece of plate armour used in the British Army, with the exception of the cuirass, or breast and back plates, of the Household Cavalry. By 1684, the gorget was worn only by Officers and had become a badge of rank worn only when on duty. From 1743, gorgets were either gilt or silver, depending on the lace and buttons of the uniform. Gorgets were abolished by General Order No. 492, dated 2nd August, 1830.