Trackmen's Lamps


Description
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Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Warning lanterns were used by the trackmen to signal oncoming trains, and track conditions. A red lantern was a signal for danger. This meant that approaching trains should avoid some obstacle or accident on the track. A green light, unlike our traffic lights, did not mean go ahead, but instead caution or proceed slowly. In other words the track was passable, but engineers should be prudent. White lamp meant all was well on the track. These lamps are dated to about 1920.

Subject(s):
Collection:
Rainy River Public Library
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 48.71664 Longitude: -94.56711
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status for this image is unknown. Should you have any identifying information for this image, please contact the Rainy River Public Library. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Rainy River Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

334 4th St.

PO Box 308

Rainy River, ON

P0W 1L0

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Trackmen's Lamps


Warning lanterns were used by the trackmen to signal oncoming trains, and track conditions. A red lantern was a signal for danger. This meant that approaching trains should avoid some obstacle or accident on the track. A green light, unlike our traffic lights, did not mean go ahead, but instead caution or proceed slowly. In other words the track was passable, but engineers should be prudent. White lamp meant all was well on the track. These lamps are dated to about 1920.