Mary J.L. Black, 1879-1937 (~1921)


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
A portrait of Mary Joanna Louisa Black., Mary J.L. Black was appointed to the position of librarian at the Fort William Public Library in 1909. At this time the library was one room opposite the jail cells, in the basement of City Hall. During her twenty eight years of service to the community, she worked tirelessly to improve library service, not just locally, but nationally. She became the first woman president of the Ontario Library Association, and in 1930 served on an American Library Association committee that studied the state of libraries across Canada. Mary J.L.Black was the founder of the local women's Canadian Club, served as secretary and then president of the Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society and was a leader of the Girl Guides. Her keen interest in bringing art and culture to the community resulted in two exhibits featuring original paintings by the Group of Seven, in 1914 and 1921.

Date of Original:
circa 1921
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
TBPL uncatalogued.
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 48.4001
    Latitude: 48.4001 Longitude: -89.31683
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Contact
Thunder Bay Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Brodie Resource Library

216 South Brodie Street

Thunder Bay, ON

P7E 1C2

Mary J.L. Black, 1879-1937 (~1921)
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Mary J.L. Black, 1879-1937 (~1921)


A portrait of Mary Joanna Louisa Black., Mary J.L. Black was appointed to the position of librarian at the Fort William Public Library in 1909. At this time the library was one room opposite the jail cells, in the basement of City Hall. During her twenty eight years of service to the community, she worked tirelessly to improve library service, not just locally, but nationally. She became the first woman president of the Ontario Library Association, and in 1930 served on an American Library Association committee that studied the state of libraries across Canada. Mary J.L.Black was the founder of the local women's Canadian Club, served as secretary and then president of the Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society and was a leader of the Girl Guides. Her keen interest in bringing art and culture to the community resulted in two exhibits featuring original paintings by the Group of Seven, in 1914 and 1921.