County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Letter to William Clarke from Florence Clarke
Description
Creators
Clarke, Florence, Author
Clarke, William
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Documents
Description
This item is a letter sent to William Clarke, a teenage English boy who had been living in Paris, Ontario for two years, from his elder sister Florence Clarke, who is living in Sheffield, England. Her letter mentions her gratefulness that William has not forgotten her. She thanks William and his chums for wishing she could visit and says she might come to Canada if the weather permits. She updates him on her work, saying she is making 30 pounds per year, and updates from the family, saying that Elizabeth and Vera often both speak fondly of him. She also mentions two recent “dreadful” events in Sheffield: a railway accident in which many passengers were burned to death, and the murder of a woman in a local park where they used to go boating. Florence lastly asks of William if he has a wrist watch as she wishes to send him one for Christmas.
Five pages, one double-sided, one envelope.
Date of Original
October 14, 1928
Subject(s)
Local identifier
2019SC001.016
Collection
Shirley Caron Collection
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
  • England, United Kingdom
    Latitude: 53.38297 Longitude: -1.4659
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
Letter to William Clarke from Florence Clarke. October 14, Shirley Caron Collection. Item No. 2019SC001.016.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address
County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary
Full Text

Oct 14 28

256 Fulwood Road,

Sheffield

My Dearest Billy, [Kins]

I am so pleased you have not forgotten

me all together my Dear I am sorry to hear you

haven't had a holiday until recently it must be very

tiring [the] same old thing over and over again,

ever time I get a shop I always tell the person

that engages me that I want a few days holiday

so that's why I'm always having a rest. I'm glad

you enjoyed your little selves at the exhibition,

four years is a long time to stay at one thing

[good nights] I should like to picture myself here 4 years

I should dye a death of thinking about it oh my

Lot I'm sorry for you dear, but I must say you've

done well to get all that cash saved up I've only

put one pound in the bank but I've got a cash

save from the Yorkshire Penny Bank I've got about

25/ in about a 1 pound in tips from visitors 5/ in odd

coppers and 6w. I don't blame your dear [for trying]

Page 2:

2/.

to get more cash if you can but don't do

like I did at my last situation go in the Irish

mans rise when I went up to [Laycocks] I was

expecting 36 pounds a year and when the old dame paid

me she gave me 30 pounds not so bad she said

that I told her I wanted 30 pounds but I'd been [getting]

36 pounds at the past place some of the old ducks are

mean they wouldn't give one 2 pounds if they could

help it.

I'm so pleased that you think the photograph

a good one I hope it was not all smashed

up in the carriage thank your chums dear for

wishing I was out with you but perhaps if

the weather permits I may be coming over soon

give them all my best love and tell them I wish

them the best of luck and I hope Sandy and Vic will

drop me a line and I will write to them if they like,

any time I should only to pleased to hear how

they all [have] been in a strange country away

from all their friends. I went to the Sheffield

Page 3:

3/.

Empire last Wednesday to see the descent Song

it was beautiful only the leading man spoiled

it he didn't seem to fit in some how the milk

chap that comes here told me I ought to see it

as it was so good. Well dear I suppose

by the you received this (note) you will

no doubt have heard from Vera. When I went

to the home a fortnight ago she was saying she

hoped Auntie Ada hadn't for gotten to post her

letter as she hadn't had any reply yet poor

little kid she still seems [aso] baby [illegible] yet

she doesn't seem to grow up and [Betty] does got

a big [girl] to I feel quite small at the side

of her. If you've received Vera's letter you will

love

got photograph of her I do think its a good

one its jut like life every one thinks its a good

one of her as its really best as she is so you

will be able to think of what she is like with

out thinking you are making a [mistakes].

I had Auntie Bertha [here] last Thursday [for]

Page 4:

4/.

day and she asked if I'd hear from you and it was

funny for us to be talking of you and then I

get a letter on the Thursday morning.

My word there is some dreadful things

happening this last week there's been a terrible

railway smash several people burned to

death and heaps injured the train ran into a

goods wagon and threw some of the passengers onto

the bridge and the burst out into flames and its

severely dreadful to think there's ever so many

people burned to death in five minutes.

There's also been a poor woman murdered at

[Hilabo] somewhere near [Hilabo] Park you will

remember where we used to go boating

when we were kids, of course the police

haven't found who murdered the poor

woman yet the nasty bad man he ought

lashed until he died, I think Sheffield is

getting as bad as London [with] things

happening I shall be afraid to go anywhere

soon if things continue like this '

Page 5:

5/.

By the way I went to Auntie Ada's at

Darnell last Sunday and we did have a time

of it uncle Ernest of [] was there and also

Dorothy to she gets a big girl and Edwin won

a scholarship to gets on 2 years schooling

free and 1 pound not bad eh. They are all keeping

well at home dear and the twins you will

remember then are getting very big boys.

You are to bad dear I [wrote] asking you

if you had a watch of any kind but

you haven't said whether you had one or not

so just write back by [return] and tell me whether

you've got one or not as it will soon be

Christmas and I want you to get a Christmas

present this year you see I want to know

whether you have a watch, a not you

see you was always so fond of one.

[That] I did not know whether you'd got one

your self or not. I think this is all dear

for the present I think everyone at

home send you their best wishes.

Page 6:

I wish luck dear boy

give my love to all your

pals dearest

fondest love your ever

loving sister Flo

xxxxx

xxxxx

for the boys xx

Envelope Front:

Sheffield

7:30 pm

Oct 16

1928

Mr. W. Clarke

C/O Mr. J Brooks

R.R.3. Paris

Ontario

Canada

Envelope Back:

Paris

AM

Oc25

28

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Letter to William Clarke from Florence Clarke


This item is a letter sent to William Clarke, a teenage English boy who had been living in Paris, Ontario for two years, from his elder sister Florence Clarke, who is living in Sheffield, England. Her letter mentions her gratefulness that William has not forgotten her. She thanks William and his chums for wishing she could visit and says she might come to Canada if the weather permits. She updates him on her work, saying she is making 30 pounds per year, and updates from the family, saying that Elizabeth and Vera often both speak fondly of him. She also mentions two recent “dreadful” events in Sheffield: a railway accident in which many passengers were burned to death, and the murder of a woman in a local park where they used to go boating. Florence lastly asks of William if he has a wrist watch as she wishes to send him one for Christmas.
Five pages, one double-sided, one envelope.