County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Letter to William Clarke from Uncle Jack and Aunt Ethel
Description
Creators
Jack, Author
Clarke, William
, Recipient
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Documents
Description
This item is a letter sent to William Clarke, a teenage English boy who had been living in Paris, Ontario for two years, from his uncle Jack, Aunt Ethel, and cousin Ethel back in Sheffield.

Uncle Jack says that their family is doing well and was excited to receive William's letter. He mentions that Florence has grown into a fine young lady, but he has not seen his younger sisters. He also mentions that he is thankfully working in a building line at the present, while there are 30,000 men out of work in Sheffield. He is pleased to hear that William has a good place.
Two pages, one envelope. Dated February 2, but correctly dated to March 9th of 1928.
Date of Original
March 9, 1928
Subject(s)
Local identifier
2019SC001.008
Collection
Shirley Caron Collection
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
  • England, United Kingdom
    Latitude: 53.38297 Longitude: -1.4659
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
Letter to William Clarke from Uncle Jack and Aunt Ethel. March 9, 1928. Shirley Caron Collection. Item No. 2019SC001.008.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address
County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary
Full Text

Dear Billie Feb 2nd, 1928

Your Auntie was quite

excited, when your letter arrived, for we

both thought you had forgotten our address.

Well Bill, I am pleased to hear, you are

making good, and that you are [taking]

to it, out there. Plenty of work, plenty of

fun, etc., all helps to make life a bit

jolly, you say I ought to come to Canada, for

a bit of [rambling] eh, look here, Bill,

there is still a lot of wild country [left]

in this cock-eyed country of ours yet

and so here I stay (some lad eh) by the

way, you are growing some -eh- I expect

you will about finish up in the

Canadian police force, oh gee, (look me over).

I said look me over [Fargent] when

oh yes, lit us have some more letters

Bill, we shall welcome them, and you

can be sure on us answering them. You will

hardly know, Sister Flo, when you see, what

a big lass, she has made, I have not,

Page 2:

seen the younger girls myself, but they

tell me, they are coming on [wonderfully].

We are all well, and Hearty at present

Sheffield as got the cup-tie fever, as [usual]

[United having] reached the semi-final

with Huddersfield, and when you read this

letter, I dare say, you will know the result.

Sheffield has built a super [illegible] palace

and what a place, it is wonderful, its

named the Regent. I am working in the

Building line at the present, but other work

in this town, lad, is rotten, there is about

thirty thousand men, alone, out of work here

so you can guess, somebody's having it a hot.

I am cutting this letter short, Bill, but

will write again soon, and don't forget

we want some off you. Very pleased you have

got a good place, give them my best

respect. P.S. sorry, made mistake on Date

above. March 9th: sorrows: Lots of love

from cousin Ethel the best of greeting

from your uncle Jack and Auntie Ethel

xxxx au revoir and the Best of health xxxx

Envelope Front:

B. Clarke,

C/O G. Brooks, R.R.3.

Paris, Ontario,

Canada.

Envelope Back:

"ME"

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Letter to William Clarke from Uncle Jack and Aunt Ethel


This item is a letter sent to William Clarke, a teenage English boy who had been living in Paris, Ontario for two years, from his uncle Jack, Aunt Ethel, and cousin Ethel back in Sheffield.

Uncle Jack says that their family is doing well and was excited to receive William's letter. He mentions that Florence has grown into a fine young lady, but he has not seen his younger sisters. He also mentions that he is thankfully working in a building line at the present, while there are 30,000 men out of work in Sheffield. He is pleased to hear that William has a good place.
Two pages, one envelope. Dated February 2, but correctly dated to March 9th of 1928.