County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Letter to George Foster and Sons from C. H. Birley
Comments (3)
Comments from Users
Posted by Yvonne Warner, 9 September 2019 at 0:43

Gentlemen, I have yours in reference to my note held by you. I thought when I spoke to you about it in the fall that I would be able to let you have part when I

sold my hogs. By the time I got them ready the price went down and I did not realise within sixty or seventy dollars of what I expected. I had my rent and taxes to make up and funeral expenses and doctor bill.

all of which had to be paid out of this money as I lost my wheat crop entirely and it placed me in a bad position. It was just my second year on the place and

I did not have enough to start clear, so it has been very close work with me. at one time I had almost decided to give up but you did not seem to press me for a

Reverse:

time. I did not know the reason until I received your letter. But it appears to me as an intervention of Providence as it has given me a chance to arrange considerable business and get in shape for another

crop. Prospects are good the wheat and clover have wintered splendidly I have thirty acres of magnificent wheat and if it harvests as good as it promises now

I will be able to free myself of all indebtedness during next winter. If you would kindly arrange to hold the note until after harvest I would make it one of the first

payments. I would not ask it but I have nothing that I can realise on with any degree of certainty until the first September. I spoke to Mr. [Groman] about it and explained things to him and I think he will be willing to endorse as before. have a talk with him and write me again. Yours truly, C. H. Birley.

Posted by Gary Jermy, 16 September 2019 at 16:39

Thank you very much for the transcription, Yvonne!

Posted by Nathan Etherington, 27 September 2019 at 22:28

Gentlemen, I have you in reference to

my note held by you. I thought when I spoke

to you about it in the fall that I would

be able to let you have part when I

sold my hogs. By the time I got there ready

the price went down and I did not realise

to their sixty or eighty dollars what I

expected. I had my seat and taxes to make

a/c and funeral expenses and doctor bill.

all of which had to be paid out of this

money as I lost my wheat crop entirely and

it placed me in a bad position. It was

just my second year on the place and

I did not have enough to start clean, so it

has been very close work with me, at one

time. I had almost decided to give up

but you did not seem to press me for a

Reverse:

time. I did not know the reason until I

received your letter. But it appears to

me as an [intervention] of Providence as it

has given me a chance to arrange considerable

business and get in shape for another

craft. Prospects are good the wheat and

clover have wintered splendidly I have

thirty acres of magnificent wheat and

if it harvests as good as it promises now

I will be able to free my rely of all indebtedness

during next winter. If you would kindly

arrange to hold the note until after

harvest I would make it one of the first

payments. I would not ask it but I have

nothing that I can realise on with any

degree of certainty until the first settlement.

I spoke to Mr. Gowman about it and explained

thing(?) to him and I think he will be writing

to endorse as before. Have a talk with him and

with me again. Yours truly, C. H. Birley.

Add your own comment.
Is it OK to make your name public?
Is it OK to make your comment public?
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Letter to George Foster and Sons from C. H. Birley


This item is a letter sent from C. H. Birley, a Paris merchant, to George Foster and Sons on March 28, 1902. Mr. Birley writes about his recent difficulties on his farming business for why he's been unable to pay back his debts, but ensures that he will make his necessary payments after the next harvest.