County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Letter from William Pate to James Pate, August 20, 1882
:


Description
Creators:
Pates, William, Author
Pate, James
, Recipient
Media Type:
Object
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
A letter from William Pate (brother) to James Pate on August 20, 1882 discussing the farm.

Page 1
Lethangie Kinrofs
My Dear Brother,
I have only once I think – and that very shortly – written you. Since you left here. I prefer – lazy as I am at writing – to write a whole letter rather than a part of one, and I think I am likely. According to my wish to have this one all the my self. In the first place I am glad to say we are all

Page 2
about our usual way, trusting you are keeping in good health and spirits. You have been learning I think, in some previous letter, of the famous crops we have at Lethargie this year, well at any rate, I think they will “bare the gree” with anybody’s round about. Hay seems to have been a very plentiful crop this year 3 £ I think is about the price they are bidding just now. We have sold none beyond the roup unless 350 stone to Mip [?] Robertson we have four good big ricks in the yard and other two to bring in.

Note: “bear the gree” (misspelled as “bare the gree” here) is an expression that means “take the top prize”

Note: “roup” is a Scottish word meaning “auction”

Page 3
The corn is much about the same as it was last year. It is beginning to change color. Farhill and Burlugh lands will be cutting within a week. The beans are a heavy crop. Potatoes too I think are about the same as last year. Low and King Grocers have both been digging a few since they were ready but we have sold
none otherwise. The turnips are all hoed and looking well enough [?] and too is being complained of. We had very bad hay weather

Page 4
this year. We had thunder and rain more or less nearly every day in July the weather settled about tho 1st of August. When we were finishing with the bit of timothy that was left unsold we had very hot days while carting in. this week again has been very wet [longing? layering?] much of the corn. I intended to have written you immediately after being at the Highlands Agricultural Societies Show at Glasgow but I think somebody else did.

Note: the “timothy” referred to here is not a person, but a type of Eurasian grass that is grown in North America for grazing and hay

Page 5
it for me. Tom and I were there the show [?] was in a sad state with [?] there was nothing new in the implement department unless these exhaust fans which are all the rage just now for drying stacks either for hand horse or steam power. We had Francis Brown here from Saturday night til Monday morning he had a great deal of fresh news from [Lesmahagow?] I don’t mind if there was anything very striking, but plenty of a trifling nature. We have had us

Page 6
other person from that direction that I mind of. I have not been up at Burlugh since I was there with you and have hardly spoken to James or [Nattie? Nathe?] since. They will be working away about there usual I think. John Allan’s Uncle [Laureismuir?] was married on the 4th of August – also John [London? Landon?] same day. John Allan was asked but he did not go west. The most of people who I hear who take it upon them to advise say you have made a bad choice.

Page 7
In the place you have gone to William Paton says Canada never be a prosperous country having too long a winter to continue with that you should migrate to a warmer however I am nor competent to advise any thing. We had the funeral letter of Old John Murdoch this week it came on the same day of the funeral and my father was at Glasgow selling the [?] that day so he was not at it but he was in Monday last at the funeral of Old Mr. Paton [?] landlord who died on Wednesday the previous week, and most sorrowful of all

Page 8
that of William Dykes which you will have already learned as far as we can inform you. This is the last note we write to your old address I suppose but I believe we will have one or two yet before we get a new address. For at [Melnallons?] [sale?] is selling low just now. [Larubs? Laurbs?] are very high we have bought none as yet. We have sold a few fat beasts but I must close as my space is filled up. Trust you will be fortunate in your selection of a new situation. I am your affectionate brother W. Pate
Date of Original:
August 20, 1882
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
2017AM001.129
Collection:
E. Ann McRae Personal Collection
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.1334 Longitude: -80.26636
Recommended Citation:
Letter from William Pate to James Pate, August 20, 1882. E. Ann McRae personal collection, 2017AM001.129.
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Letter from William Pate to James Pate, August 20, 1882


A letter from William Pate (brother) to James Pate on August 20, 1882 discussing the farm.

Page 1
Lethangie Kinrofs
My Dear Brother,
I have only once I think – and that very shortly – written you. Since you left here. I prefer – lazy as I am at writing – to write a whole letter rather than a part of one, and I think I am likely. According to my wish to have this one all the my self. In the first place I am glad to say we are all

Page 2
about our usual way, trusting you are keeping in good health and spirits. You have been learning I think, in some previous letter, of the famous crops we have at Lethargie this year, well at any rate, I think they will “bare the gree” with anybody’s round about. Hay seems to have been a very plentiful crop this year 3 £ I think is about the price they are bidding just now. We have sold none beyond the roup unless 350 stone to Mip [?] Robertson we have four good big ricks in the yard and other two to bring in.

Note: “bear the gree” (misspelled as “bare the gree” here) is an expression that means “take the top prize”

Note: “roup” is a Scottish word meaning “auction”

Page 3
The corn is much about the same as it was last year. It is beginning to change color. Farhill and Burlugh lands will be cutting within a week. The beans are a heavy crop. Potatoes too I think are about the same as last year. Low and King Grocers have both been digging a few since they were ready but we have sold
none otherwise. The turnips are all hoed and looking well enough [?] and too is being complained of. We had very bad hay weather

Page 4
this year. We had thunder and rain more or less nearly every day in July the weather settled about tho 1st of August. When we were finishing with the bit of timothy that was left unsold we had very hot days while carting in. this week again has been very wet [longing? layering?] much of the corn. I intended to have written you immediately after being at the Highlands Agricultural Societies Show at Glasgow but I think somebody else did.

Note: the “timothy” referred to here is not a person, but a type of Eurasian grass that is grown in North America for grazing and hay

Page 5
it for me. Tom and I were there the show [?] was in a sad state with [?] there was nothing new in the implement department unless these exhaust fans which are all the rage just now for drying stacks either for hand horse or steam power. We had Francis Brown here from Saturday night til Monday morning he had a great deal of fresh news from [Lesmahagow?] I don’t mind if there was anything very striking, but plenty of a trifling nature. We have had us

Page 6
other person from that direction that I mind of. I have not been up at Burlugh since I was there with you and have hardly spoken to James or [Nattie? Nathe?] since. They will be working away about there usual I think. John Allan’s Uncle [Laureismuir?] was married on the 4th of August – also John [London? Landon?] same day. John Allan was asked but he did not go west. The most of people who I hear who take it upon them to advise say you have made a bad choice.

Page 7
In the place you have gone to William Paton says Canada never be a prosperous country having too long a winter to continue with that you should migrate to a warmer however I am nor competent to advise any thing. We had the funeral letter of Old John Murdoch this week it came on the same day of the funeral and my father was at Glasgow selling the [?] that day so he was not at it but he was in Monday last at the funeral of Old Mr. Paton [?] landlord who died on Wednesday the previous week, and most sorrowful of all

Page 8
that of William Dykes which you will have already learned as far as we can inform you. This is the last note we write to your old address I suppose but I believe we will have one or two yet before we get a new address. For at [Melnallons?] [sale?] is selling low just now. [Larubs? Laurbs?] are very high we have bought none as yet. We have sold a few fat beasts but I must close as my space is filled up. Trust you will be fortunate in your selection of a new situation. I am your affectionate brother W. Pate