County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Hiram Capron Homestead


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:

Summary

This home, located on Homestead Road, is the oldest surviving building in Paris built in 1831; it belonged to the founder of Paris, Hiram Capron. This home once held a general store and Paris’ first post office. It was built on the site of early settler William Holmes’ log cabin. Much of the home has been restored to its original state with original tongue and groove flooring, basement, front door, and open pine beam ceilings in the dining room.1


Timeline

1831 - House was built1

c.1840s - Fireplace replaced with stove1

c.1840s - First renovation took place in this decade – accordion loft construction1

1843 - Tenant farmers lived here until 19421

1942 - Gladys Stewart-Jones purchased home1

c.1940s - Floor was replaced in the storeroom/bathroom1

???? - Bedroom renovated into kitchen1

1947 - Cedar windows added1

1947 - Fieldstone patio added1

1947 - Dormers added1

Recycled shingles added to dormers from chimney.

???? - House rewired1

???? - Red lightpost added to the front of the house1

???? - Kitchen was bumped out1

???? - Wallpaper added1

1962 - Hamilton-Wright family purchased home1

c.1960s - Kitchen was renovated1

c.1960s - Back door added to main floor bedroom1

1984 - Norma-Jaye Fredrickson purchased home1

1988 - Miss family purchased home1

c.1980s - Kitchen was renovated1

???? - Door to the storeroom/bathroom was moved to the left to make the kitchen larger1

1997 - Circular eavestrough added to home1

???? - Window added to dining room and fireplace taken out1

???? - New surrounding added to fireplace in parlour room1

???? - Wall torn down in dining room and shelving built in1

2002 - Fence built1

???? - Fieldstone patio in the back was removed and replaced with small wooden deck1

???? - Bedroom renovated into family room1

???? - Red lightpost taken out1

???? - Wallpaper taken out1

2010 - Well added to the front of the property1

2011 - Kitchen renovated1

???? - Garage added which was a copy of a drive shed1

???? - Kitchen bumped back in1

???? - Shed added which was a copy of smoke house and is fully operational as a smoke house1

Blueprints of Dr. Shaver’s smokehouse.

???? - Doorway in back of house replaced by window1

???? - Doorway in storeroom/bathroom replaced by window1

???? - Storeroom/Clean up room renovated into bathroom1

1998 - Septic tank removed1


Summary of Inhabitants

Hiram Capron

Hiram was born in 1796 in Leicester, Vermont. He moved to New York to work as a book keeper at the age of 21 and soon after was promoted to superintendent. Eventually, he sought more out of life and wanted to pursue a life in business and build his very own blast furnace. He set out to Long Point to build a furnace. In 1823, he was travelling and selling iron-ware when he stumbled onto the land of William Holme. He loved the area so much that he purchased Holme’s lands and businesses. In 1824, he married Mary De Long whom he had met at Long Point. While building a family in Paris, he also imported his family from his birth place. In 1829, he hired Lewis Burwell to survey the streets and draw up a town map. He started selling land to settlers and promoted businesses in the area. When global financial panic happened in 1857, it led to the end of free trade and hurt land prices. He eventually sold off his Toronto properties to meet his debts which had significantly lost their value. He passed away in 1872 at the old age of 76.2


Architectural Features

Built in 1831, this is the oldest surviving home in Paris. This stucco home features four six over six sash double hung windows with a low gable roof. It has two overhang gable dormers with 2 sash horizontal sliding windows. Recycled shingles were added to the dormers from the chimney. This home features tongue and groove flooring that has never been painted. The original pine open beam ceilings in the living room have been restored. The original fireplace in the parlour room is still intact; the door that leads outside from the parlour room is no longer used. The original basement has not been tampered with but many other changes have taken place throughout the home. By 1960, there were 3 ceilings added on top of each other. To expose the original beams in the living rooms, the ceilings had to be taken down. In the 1940s-1950s, the general store that was attached to the home had been taken down. A replica drive shed and smokehouse were added to the property. While some renovations were being done, the name “Clarence Coplin 1831” was etched into the now-kitchen. It was believed that he may have helped with the construction of the home. The kitchen door and the family room door are estimated to be from the late 18th century ; it is believed that these doors are older than the home.


Notes

  1. Miss, Robert. Personal Interview. July 2017.
  2. County of Brant Heritage Committee.July 2017.

References

  • Miss, Robert. Personal Interview. July 2017.
  • County of Brant Heritage Committee.July 2017.

Date of Original:
1831
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Capron, Hiram
Local identifier:
2017CB008
Collection:
Historic Buildings of the County of Brant
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 43.2
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
Creative Commons licence:
by-nc-nd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Date:
2017
Copyright Holder:
County of Brant Public Library
Copyright Holder Contact Information:
12 William Street, Paris, Ontario
Recommended Citation:
Hiram Capron Homestead. County of Brant Public Library, Item No. 2017CB008.
Terms of Use:
For Research Purposes Only.
Contact
Paris Museum and Historical Society
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Paris Museum and Historical Society

51 William Street, Paris, ON

N3L 1N4

(519) 442-9295

Hiram Capron Homestead
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Hiram Capron Homestead



Summary

This home, located on Homestead Road, is the oldest surviving building in Paris built in 1831; it belonged to the founder of Paris, Hiram Capron. This home once held a general store and Paris’ first post office. It was built on the site of early settler William Holmes’ log cabin. Much of the home has been restored to its original state with original tongue and groove flooring, basement, front door, and open pine beam ceilings in the dining room.1


Timeline

1831 - House was built1

c.1840s - Fireplace replaced with stove1

c.1840s - First renovation took place in this decade – accordion loft construction1

1843 - Tenant farmers lived here until 19421

1942 - Gladys Stewart-Jones purchased home1

c.1940s - Floor was replaced in the storeroom/bathroom1

???? - Bedroom renovated into kitchen1

1947 - Cedar windows added1

1947 - Fieldstone patio added1

1947 - Dormers added1

Recycled shingles added to dormers from chimney.

???? - House rewired1

???? - Red lightpost added to the front of the house1

???? - Kitchen was bumped out1

???? - Wallpaper added1

1962 - Hamilton-Wright family purchased home1

c.1960s - Kitchen was renovated1

c.1960s - Back door added to main floor bedroom1

1984 - Norma-Jaye Fredrickson purchased home1

1988 - Miss family purchased home1

c.1980s - Kitchen was renovated1

???? - Door to the storeroom/bathroom was moved to the left to make the kitchen larger1

1997 - Circular eavestrough added to home1

???? - Window added to dining room and fireplace taken out1

???? - New surrounding added to fireplace in parlour room1

???? - Wall torn down in dining room and shelving built in1

2002 - Fence built1

???? - Fieldstone patio in the back was removed and replaced with small wooden deck1

???? - Bedroom renovated into family room1

???? - Red lightpost taken out1

???? - Wallpaper taken out1

2010 - Well added to the front of the property1

2011 - Kitchen renovated1

???? - Garage added which was a copy of a drive shed1

???? - Kitchen bumped back in1

???? - Shed added which was a copy of smoke house and is fully operational as a smoke house1

Blueprints of Dr. Shaver’s smokehouse.

???? - Doorway in back of house replaced by window1

???? - Doorway in storeroom/bathroom replaced by window1

???? - Storeroom/Clean up room renovated into bathroom1

1998 - Septic tank removed1


Summary of Inhabitants

Hiram Capron

Hiram was born in 1796 in Leicester, Vermont. He moved to New York to work as a book keeper at the age of 21 and soon after was promoted to superintendent. Eventually, he sought more out of life and wanted to pursue a life in business and build his very own blast furnace. He set out to Long Point to build a furnace. In 1823, he was travelling and selling iron-ware when he stumbled onto the land of William Holme. He loved the area so much that he purchased Holme’s lands and businesses. In 1824, he married Mary De Long whom he had met at Long Point. While building a family in Paris, he also imported his family from his birth place. In 1829, he hired Lewis Burwell to survey the streets and draw up a town map. He started selling land to settlers and promoted businesses in the area. When global financial panic happened in 1857, it led to the end of free trade and hurt land prices. He eventually sold off his Toronto properties to meet his debts which had significantly lost their value. He passed away in 1872 at the old age of 76.2


Architectural Features

Built in 1831, this is the oldest surviving home in Paris. This stucco home features four six over six sash double hung windows with a low gable roof. It has two overhang gable dormers with 2 sash horizontal sliding windows. Recycled shingles were added to the dormers from the chimney. This home features tongue and groove flooring that has never been painted. The original pine open beam ceilings in the living room have been restored. The original fireplace in the parlour room is still intact; the door that leads outside from the parlour room is no longer used. The original basement has not been tampered with but many other changes have taken place throughout the home. By 1960, there were 3 ceilings added on top of each other. To expose the original beams in the living rooms, the ceilings had to be taken down. In the 1940s-1950s, the general store that was attached to the home had been taken down. A replica drive shed and smokehouse were added to the property. While some renovations were being done, the name “Clarence Coplin 1831” was etched into the now-kitchen. It was believed that he may have helped with the construction of the home. The kitchen door and the family room door are estimated to be from the late 18th century ; it is believed that these doors are older than the home.


Notes

  1. Miss, Robert. Personal Interview. July 2017.
  2. County of Brant Heritage Committee.July 2017.

References

  • Miss, Robert. Personal Interview. July 2017.
  • County of Brant Heritage Committee.July 2017.