County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Charles Arnold House


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:

Summary

This house on Arnold Street, thought to be Charles Arnold’s first home, is a 2377 square feet stucco home with a cobblestone foundation. Charles Arnold purchased the land from Hiram Capron and built the storey and a half lathe plaster home. It was stuccoed in 1965. A lot of renovations have taken place throughout the years, but the original home is still captured perfectly.1


Timeline

c.1840s - House was built1

1848 - Hiram Capron and wife sold to Charles Arnold all of Lot 2 east side Arnold Street1

1912 - Mrs Postill and her 5 children moved here after the death of Mr. Postill in a farming accident1

There was no electricity then and a proper water system with bath had to be put in

1948 - John and Alma Howells purchased home1

1948 - James Donovan purchased home1

1953 - Fern Rook applied for a building permit so that he could make repairs to the stucco and garage at an estimated cost of $500.001

c.1965 - Mr. and Mrs. Reg Adams bought the house1

It was a brown stucco building with a green roof. Inside the floors were solid pine. The house was a rental property for several years until the 1980s.

1965 - House re-stuccoed1

???? - Kitchen addition1

1984 - Debbie Tremblay and Husband, Claude, purchased home1

House was run down with the plumbing and furnace not working. Debbie saw its potential and purchased the home.

???? - Ceramic tiles installed1

???? - New windows installed1

???? - Stained Glass panels added in the sidelights1

They were made by Debbie.

???? - New set of skylights in the foyer1

???? - Wall lighting added in between living room and dining room1

In order to do this, Claude had to remove the entire wall and doorway and uncovered a brick hearth. The exposed brick wall divides the two main rooms which are illuminated by boxed in potlighting at the ceiling where the old door used to be.


Summary of Inhabitants

Charles Arnold

Born December 17, 1818 in Bedfordshire, England. Emigrated to Paris, Ontario with his family when he was 14 years old. He apprenticed to Asa Wolverton to learn carpentry. In 1844, he married Agnes Taylor when he was 26 years old. Arnold started his own nursery and registered a mortgage on Lot 2 in 1852. He had four children – Amelia, George, Charles and Susan. He was one of the first Councillors when Paris was incorporated as a village. Agnes Arnold passed away in 1854 and he remarried in 1855 to Margaret Shackleton and had two children, Ella and Ida. In 1884, Charles dies at 64 years due to an enlarged heart. His son, George, continued the nursery business.1

Mr.and Mrs.Adams

Mrs. Adams earned a diploma in A.T.C.M to teach music but did not pursue a career in the field since she married Mr. Adams in 1930 and started their poultry business and nursery. Two fires ended that venture. She was a member of the Paris Lady Lions for many years and was a member of St. Paul’s United Church for many years. Mr. Adams was a photographer who became interested in pollination by bees. He took a course at the University of Guelph in Horticulture and then continued pollination studies at Waterloo University. He co-wrote a book called “Atlas of Pollen of the Trees and Shrubs of Eastern Canada and the Adjacent United States.”1


Architectural Features

This detached two-storey stucco home with 2377 square feet is said to have been built sometime in the 1840s. It originally had seven rooms with it eventually having 10 rooms by 1948. The basement features the original cobblestone foundation and it was believed that the basement was once the kitchen; during a renovation the remains of a beehive oven were uncovered. It features the original front door and transom. The original pine floors are upstairs with 80% red pine planking with some boards as wide as 18 inches in what had been the servant’s quarters. It has a monochromatic colour scheme and central chimney. The vernacular house blended with classical and picturesque elements, are capable of existing by the tudor labels over the windows, the modest portico, and the returning eaves that cut sharply back into the side walls. The lower storey has eight over twelve paned windows and 25 rows of cobblestone.1


Notes

  1. Paris Museum and Archives. July 2017.

References

  • Paris Museum and Archives. July 2017.

Date of Original:
1840
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Arnold, Charles ; Capron, Hiram
Local identifier:
2017CB008
Collection:
Historic Buildings of the County of Brant
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 43.2
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
Creative Commons licence:
by-nc-nd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Date:
2017
Copyright Holder:
County of Brant Public Library
Copyright Holder Contact Information:
12 William Street, Paris, Ontario
Recommended Citation:
Charles Arnold House. County of Brant Public Library, Item No. 2017CB008.
Terms of Use:
For Research Purposes Only.
Contact
Paris Museum and Historical Society
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Paris Museum and Historical Society

51 William Street, Paris, ON

N3L 1N4

(519) 442-9295

Charles Arnold House
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Charles Arnold House



Summary

This house on Arnold Street, thought to be Charles Arnold’s first home, is a 2377 square feet stucco home with a cobblestone foundation. Charles Arnold purchased the land from Hiram Capron and built the storey and a half lathe plaster home. It was stuccoed in 1965. A lot of renovations have taken place throughout the years, but the original home is still captured perfectly.1


Timeline

c.1840s - House was built1

1848 - Hiram Capron and wife sold to Charles Arnold all of Lot 2 east side Arnold Street1

1912 - Mrs Postill and her 5 children moved here after the death of Mr. Postill in a farming accident1

There was no electricity then and a proper water system with bath had to be put in

1948 - John and Alma Howells purchased home1

1948 - James Donovan purchased home1

1953 - Fern Rook applied for a building permit so that he could make repairs to the stucco and garage at an estimated cost of $500.001

c.1965 - Mr. and Mrs. Reg Adams bought the house1

It was a brown stucco building with a green roof. Inside the floors were solid pine. The house was a rental property for several years until the 1980s.

1965 - House re-stuccoed1

???? - Kitchen addition1

1984 - Debbie Tremblay and Husband, Claude, purchased home1

House was run down with the plumbing and furnace not working. Debbie saw its potential and purchased the home.

???? - Ceramic tiles installed1

???? - New windows installed1

???? - Stained Glass panels added in the sidelights1

They were made by Debbie.

???? - New set of skylights in the foyer1

???? - Wall lighting added in between living room and dining room1

In order to do this, Claude had to remove the entire wall and doorway and uncovered a brick hearth. The exposed brick wall divides the two main rooms which are illuminated by boxed in potlighting at the ceiling where the old door used to be.


Summary of Inhabitants

Charles Arnold

Born December 17, 1818 in Bedfordshire, England. Emigrated to Paris, Ontario with his family when he was 14 years old. He apprenticed to Asa Wolverton to learn carpentry. In 1844, he married Agnes Taylor when he was 26 years old. Arnold started his own nursery and registered a mortgage on Lot 2 in 1852. He had four children – Amelia, George, Charles and Susan. He was one of the first Councillors when Paris was incorporated as a village. Agnes Arnold passed away in 1854 and he remarried in 1855 to Margaret Shackleton and had two children, Ella and Ida. In 1884, Charles dies at 64 years due to an enlarged heart. His son, George, continued the nursery business.1

Mr.and Mrs.Adams

Mrs. Adams earned a diploma in A.T.C.M to teach music but did not pursue a career in the field since she married Mr. Adams in 1930 and started their poultry business and nursery. Two fires ended that venture. She was a member of the Paris Lady Lions for many years and was a member of St. Paul’s United Church for many years. Mr. Adams was a photographer who became interested in pollination by bees. He took a course at the University of Guelph in Horticulture and then continued pollination studies at Waterloo University. He co-wrote a book called “Atlas of Pollen of the Trees and Shrubs of Eastern Canada and the Adjacent United States.”1


Architectural Features

This detached two-storey stucco home with 2377 square feet is said to have been built sometime in the 1840s. It originally had seven rooms with it eventually having 10 rooms by 1948. The basement features the original cobblestone foundation and it was believed that the basement was once the kitchen; during a renovation the remains of a beehive oven were uncovered. It features the original front door and transom. The original pine floors are upstairs with 80% red pine planking with some boards as wide as 18 inches in what had been the servant’s quarters. It has a monochromatic colour scheme and central chimney. The vernacular house blended with classical and picturesque elements, are capable of existing by the tudor labels over the windows, the modest portico, and the returning eaves that cut sharply back into the side walls. The lower storey has eight over twelve paned windows and 25 rows of cobblestone.1


Notes

  1. Paris Museum and Archives. July 2017.

References

  • Paris Museum and Archives. July 2017.