County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
The Hamilton Farm


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:

House Summary

This home on Number 6 School Road is commonly referred to as the Hamilton Farm as it has been in the Hamilton Family for over 100 years before changing hands. It is a unique mix between Regency and Ontario Gothic, estimated to be built around 1860. It was part of lot 23/24 of River Range, Concession Three.1


Timeline

c. 1862 - The Crown sold land to Robert and Edith Hamilton2

1879 – Robert and Edith Hamilton sold to family2

???? – Archibald Hamilton purchased home2

1950 – Reginald Hamilton purchased home2

1961 – John Earl and Gertrude Hamilton purchased home2

1961 – Reginald Hamilton sold part of property to Harry and Agatha Lock.2

1965 – John and Polly Makrynchuk purchased home2

1968 – Meryl and Kathleen Stevenson purchased home2

1968 – Gordon and Margaret Cole purchased home2

1973 - Clifton and Amelia Elliot purchased home2

1978 - Robert Locke purchased home2

1979 – Ronald and Carmen McNaulty purchased home2

1985 - John McGregor and Paula Arthur purchased home2

1987 - Donna Godfrey purchased home2

2001 - William Yoshio and Edith Christne Scrivener purchased home1



Architectural Features

This red brick Regency-Gothic mix home features a center door main façade with a medium center gable. The main door is a replacement replica with sidelights and rectangular transom; it also has soldier course brick work. The bottom floor windows are 4 sash double hung with mullions and soldier course brick work. The top floor window is a simple one over one double hung window with an arched transom and arched brick work. The roof features all original wood trim and decorative quoining on the sides. The left hand side features decorative quoining and 4 one over one sash double hung windows with soldier course brick work. The back left is believed to have been the original part of the home before getting the front part added on later as the family grew. The original back left features two vinyl dormers with an overhang and small windows which were later added on. On the bottom, there is a simple one over one sash double hung window with soldier course brick work and a door with a window pane. There is also mismatched brick in the area beside the window where there used to be a door which was made into a window and then bricked up. There is also a small wooden deck for a barbeque and patio set. The south side of the home is the oldest part of the home. It used to have two windows that have since been bricked up with the soldier course brick work still seen. The window and door, which are currently there, seem to have been added later on as the brick work is different. On the right hand side, we have decorative quoining on the sides with four one over one sash double hung windows. All of the windows have soldier course brick work. On the back right side, there were two dormers with an overhand and small windows added. There is also a verandah which was a replacement but close to the original design. This back part of the home was made into apartments. The home features a unique original red brick foundation and all original barns on the property. The back part of the home features the original chimney and the front part of the home had two chimneys that were taken out; there was one chimney on either side of the house. For the interior, the home features all original wood trim, original staircase and decorative scroll, walnut banister post, pine pegs, and original door and trim to the dining room. All windows have been replaced as replicas and the interior windows on the main floor are panelled all the way to the floor and it is estimated to be about 4 bricks thick. The original pine floors have been stripped to reveal open wood flooring and painted orca.1


Notes

  1. Scrivener, Christine. Personal Interview, July 2017.
  2. Land Registry Office. July 2017

References

  • Land Registry Office. July 2017.
  • Scrivener, Christine. (July 2017). Personal Interview.

Date of Original:
1862
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Hamilton, Robert
Local identifier:
2017CB008
Collection:
Historic Buildings of the County of Brant
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.1334 Longitude: -80.11635
Creative Commons licence:
by-nc-nd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Date:
2017
Copyright Holder:
County of Brant Public Library
Copyright Holder Contact Information:
12 William Street, Paris, Ontario
Recommended Citation:
Hamilton Farm, 2017. County of Brant Public Library. Item No. 2017CB008.
Terms of Use:
For Research Purposes Only.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

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The Hamilton Farm



House Summary

This home on Number 6 School Road is commonly referred to as the Hamilton Farm as it has been in the Hamilton Family for over 100 years before changing hands. It is a unique mix between Regency and Ontario Gothic, estimated to be built around 1860. It was part of lot 23/24 of River Range, Concession Three.1


Timeline

c. 1862 - The Crown sold land to Robert and Edith Hamilton2

1879 – Robert and Edith Hamilton sold to family2

???? – Archibald Hamilton purchased home2

1950 – Reginald Hamilton purchased home2

1961 – John Earl and Gertrude Hamilton purchased home2

1961 – Reginald Hamilton sold part of property to Harry and Agatha Lock.2

1965 – John and Polly Makrynchuk purchased home2

1968 – Meryl and Kathleen Stevenson purchased home2

1968 – Gordon and Margaret Cole purchased home2

1973 - Clifton and Amelia Elliot purchased home2

1978 - Robert Locke purchased home2

1979 – Ronald and Carmen McNaulty purchased home2

1985 - John McGregor and Paula Arthur purchased home2

1987 - Donna Godfrey purchased home2

2001 - William Yoshio and Edith Christne Scrivener purchased home1



Architectural Features

This red brick Regency-Gothic mix home features a center door main façade with a medium center gable. The main door is a replacement replica with sidelights and rectangular transom; it also has soldier course brick work. The bottom floor windows are 4 sash double hung with mullions and soldier course brick work. The top floor window is a simple one over one double hung window with an arched transom and arched brick work. The roof features all original wood trim and decorative quoining on the sides. The left hand side features decorative quoining and 4 one over one sash double hung windows with soldier course brick work. The back left is believed to have been the original part of the home before getting the front part added on later as the family grew. The original back left features two vinyl dormers with an overhang and small windows which were later added on. On the bottom, there is a simple one over one sash double hung window with soldier course brick work and a door with a window pane. There is also mismatched brick in the area beside the window where there used to be a door which was made into a window and then bricked up. There is also a small wooden deck for a barbeque and patio set. The south side of the home is the oldest part of the home. It used to have two windows that have since been bricked up with the soldier course brick work still seen. The window and door, which are currently there, seem to have been added later on as the brick work is different. On the right hand side, we have decorative quoining on the sides with four one over one sash double hung windows. All of the windows have soldier course brick work. On the back right side, there were two dormers with an overhand and small windows added. There is also a verandah which was a replacement but close to the original design. This back part of the home was made into apartments. The home features a unique original red brick foundation and all original barns on the property. The back part of the home features the original chimney and the front part of the home had two chimneys that were taken out; there was one chimney on either side of the house. For the interior, the home features all original wood trim, original staircase and decorative scroll, walnut banister post, pine pegs, and original door and trim to the dining room. All windows have been replaced as replicas and the interior windows on the main floor are panelled all the way to the floor and it is estimated to be about 4 bricks thick. The original pine floors have been stripped to reveal open wood flooring and painted orca.1


Notes

  1. Scrivener, Christine. Personal Interview, July 2017.
  2. Land Registry Office. July 2017

References

  • Land Registry Office. July 2017.
  • Scrivener, Christine. (July 2017). Personal Interview.