County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
John "Jack" Chapple Tate and Unidentified Male


Description
Mystery Question:
Can you identify the man on the right?
[Please answer by clicking on the Comments tab]
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Black and white photograph of Jack Tate [left] and an unidentified male [right], both wearing a Royal Canadian Air Force No. 5 service uniform and peak cap, and smoking a cigarette. The unidentified male has a wing badge over his left breast, although the rank is unknown. They stand in front of the main façade of the Peace Tower of the Parliament Building Centre Block in Ottawa, Ontario. Above the arch is the Coat of Arms of Canada escutcheon surmounted by the Tudor Crown or the Imperial Crown, surrounded by twenty flags, possibly the provincial flags.

Photograph is captioned "Ottawa, 1942."
Notes:
John “Jack” Chapple Tate was the youngest of three children of George R. and Gertrude Louise [Chapple] Tate, born in Paris, Ontario on 19 January 1911. He grew up at 79 Walnut Street, and attended Paris Central Public School, Paris District High School, and St. James Anglican Church. His sister Lucy Margaret Tate was a teacher at Paris Central School, and his brother George R. Tate was a foreman at the Gypsum, Lime & Alabaster plant in Caledonia.

Jack served as a Corporal in the 10th Brant Dragoons from 1925 to 1928 and in the Royal Canadian Dragoons for a month in 1925. He attended Brantford Business College from 1927 to 1928 taking book keeping, and worked as a grocery clerk for the following two years. He began working at Gypsum, Lime & Alabaster in 1930 and became a foreman a year later, working over the next ten years at the Paris and Caledonia branches.

In July 1940, he married Mary Kathleen Welsh of Ayr, Ontario. The couple lived at 78 Sheridan Street in Brantford. On 22 July 1940, Jack enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in Hamilton. In the “Special Qualifications, Hobbies, etc., useful to the R.C.A.F.” section of his attestation papers, he writes: “I have no fear in the air and delight in aerobatics, tail spins etc. I have several times frightened the instructor as he will testify.” World War II Service Records reveal that he had applied to enlist in the RCAF in Hamilton September 1939, but the application was lost.

He trained at Camp Borden, Regina, Montreal, Debert, and Jarvis, receiving his Wireless Air Gunner’s wings and promotion to a Sergeant on 25 April 1941. In June 1941, he served overseas in the No. 407 “Demon” Long Range Patrol Squadron under the Royal Air Force Coastal Command. Based around England, the Demons’ used the Lockheed Hudson, operating as a “strike” squadron, attacking enemy shipping from September 1941 to January 1943. Jack took part in 43 operational flights, and his immediate crew was credited with destroying four ships in six attacks. Of the 54 Canadian members of the 407 Squadron to serve overseas during the Second World War, Tate was one of seventeen to return home.

On 28 April 1942, Jack received his commission as a Pilot Officer, and returned to Canada on 16 June 1942. He was posted to Yarmouth where he trained as a radio officer, and carried out flight operations along the St Lawrence Valley. During this positing, Mary moved to Yarmouth to join Jack, and assisted the local war effort by driving a military ambulance.

While temporarily stationed at Mont-Joli, Jack along with three crewmembers performed an anti-submarine patrol off the coast of Labrador during the early hours of 14 October 1942. Around 5:30 am, their Hudson aircraft fatally crashed near Chandler, Quebec. A lumberjack working in the area heard the explosion, and the site was discovered after three days of searching. The cause of the accident was unknown, although the investigation records suggest the port motor caught fire while in flight, and the aircraft was at too low of an altitude to bail out. Thirteen days prior to his death, Jack was promoted to the rank of Flying Officer.

Tate was buried with full military honours by the Royal Canadian Air Force in his home town of Paris, Ontario. A military funeral procession was led from St. James Anglican Church, down Grand River Street, along William Street, to the St. James Anglican Church Cemetery. John Chapple Tate’s name appears on the Second World War Memorial Plaque displayed at the Paris District High School.

For more information, visit the External Links.
Date Of Event:
1942
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Tate, John "Jack" Chapple
Local identifier:
2017EG001.004
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 45.42094 Longitude: -75.69029
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
Donor:
M. Eleanor (Tate) Gloster
Creative Commons licence:
by-sa [more details]
Recommended Citation:
John "Jack" Chapple Tate and Unidentified Male. M. Eleanor Gloster, 2017EG001.004.
Terms of Use:
The information and images provided are for personal research only and are not to be used for commercial purposes. Use of this information should include the credit "County of Brant Public Library".
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County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

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John "Jack" Chapple Tate and Unidentified Male


Black and white photograph of Jack Tate [left] and an unidentified male [right], both wearing a Royal Canadian Air Force No. 5 service uniform and peak cap, and smoking a cigarette. The unidentified male has a wing badge over his left breast, although the rank is unknown. They stand in front of the main façade of the Peace Tower of the Parliament Building Centre Block in Ottawa, Ontario. Above the arch is the Coat of Arms of Canada escutcheon surmounted by the Tudor Crown or the Imperial Crown, surrounded by twenty flags, possibly the provincial flags.

Photograph is captioned "Ottawa, 1942."