County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Charles Douglas Smith House


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:

House Summary

The Charles Douglas Smith House of the Burford Township was built circa 1860 by Charles Douglas Smith. It is presumed that Charles’ father Russel severed land for him that was originally part of Russel Smith’s vineyard. While not much is known of the history after this time, the Charles Douglas Smith house was purchased by the Smith family (no relation to Charles) in 1933 and has remained in the family’s ownership ever since. The property has a ginseng farm and features a yellow brick house with an addition that was built in 1998.1


Timeline

c. 1860 – Constructed for Charles Douglas Smith1

Charles Douglas Smith’s father Russel Smith gave Charles the land in around 1860 but possibly later than this exact year due to Charles' birth year being 1844. A yellow-brick home was then built on the property.1

1918 - Charles Died in Dundas, Ontario2

Although the ownership of the home after Charles is unknown, it is known that Charles left the Fairfield Plains area sometime before his death in 1918.2

1933 – Purchased by Charles and Evelyn Smith (No Relation to Charles Douglas Smith)1

1971 – Purchased by Doug and Carol Smith1

Doug and Carol Smith are Charles and Evelyn Smith's son and daughter-in-law.

1998 – An Addition was Built on the Back of the Home1


Summary of Inhabitants

Charles Douglas Smith

Charles Douglas Smith was born in 1844 in the Fairfield Plains area (presumably at Russel Smith's house next door). In September of 1876 he married Mary Louise Chatterson (born July 11, 1849). Charles Douglas Smith died in 1918 in Dundas, Wentworth County and Mary Louise Chatterson in 1925 in Hamilton, Wentworth County. The couple had two children together - Emma Maude Ethel Smith and Edgerton Douglas Smith.2

Architectural Features

The Charles Douglas Smith house is a one and a half storey yellow buff brick Gothic Revival home with an asymmetrical façade. The home features a high gable roof and side right cross gable. The layout of the front unit is an L-shape, common of Ontario farmhouses of the time. There is also an attached back unit to the home. The main door is centered with a semi-circular opening shape, and has a sashed semi-circular transom and sashed, flush light side panels. The homes most notable features on the façade are the bay dormer tower and dormer gable window on the opposite side. Above the round double hung windows with transoms are arch radiating voussoirs. The brickwork is stretcher bond and the sides of the home have brick quoins for decoration. The home has projecting verges and deep overhanging eaves.


Notes

  1. Smith, Carolyn. Personal Interview, July 2016.
  2. home.cogeco.ca. "Bigger_Biggar Families (includes Marshall, Rymal, Pettit and Smith)," retrieved July 2016.

References

  • Smith, Carolyn. (July 2016). Personal Interview.
  • home.cogeco.ca. (n.d.). "Bigger_Biggar Families (includes Marshall, Rymal, Pettit and Smith)," retrieved July 2016.

Date of Original:
1860
Subject(s):
Collection:
Historic Buildings of the County of Brant
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.0834 Longitude: -80.49968
Creative Commons licence:
by-nc-nd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Date:
2016
Copyright Holder:
County of Brant Public Library
Recommended Citation:
Charles Douglas Smith House, 2016. County of Brant Public Library. Item No. 2016CB006.
Terms of Use:
For research purposes only.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Charles Douglas Smith House



House Summary

The Charles Douglas Smith House of the Burford Township was built circa 1860 by Charles Douglas Smith. It is presumed that Charles’ father Russel severed land for him that was originally part of Russel Smith’s vineyard. While not much is known of the history after this time, the Charles Douglas Smith house was purchased by the Smith family (no relation to Charles) in 1933 and has remained in the family’s ownership ever since. The property has a ginseng farm and features a yellow brick house with an addition that was built in 1998.1


Timeline

c. 1860 – Constructed for Charles Douglas Smith1

Charles Douglas Smith’s father Russel Smith gave Charles the land in around 1860 but possibly later than this exact year due to Charles' birth year being 1844. A yellow-brick home was then built on the property.1

1918 - Charles Died in Dundas, Ontario2

Although the ownership of the home after Charles is unknown, it is known that Charles left the Fairfield Plains area sometime before his death in 1918.2

1933 – Purchased by Charles and Evelyn Smith (No Relation to Charles Douglas Smith)1

1971 – Purchased by Doug and Carol Smith1

Doug and Carol Smith are Charles and Evelyn Smith's son and daughter-in-law.

1998 – An Addition was Built on the Back of the Home1


Summary of Inhabitants

Charles Douglas Smith

Charles Douglas Smith was born in 1844 in the Fairfield Plains area (presumably at Russel Smith's house next door). In September of 1876 he married Mary Louise Chatterson (born July 11, 1849). Charles Douglas Smith died in 1918 in Dundas, Wentworth County and Mary Louise Chatterson in 1925 in Hamilton, Wentworth County. The couple had two children together - Emma Maude Ethel Smith and Edgerton Douglas Smith.2

Architectural Features

The Charles Douglas Smith house is a one and a half storey yellow buff brick Gothic Revival home with an asymmetrical façade. The home features a high gable roof and side right cross gable. The layout of the front unit is an L-shape, common of Ontario farmhouses of the time. There is also an attached back unit to the home. The main door is centered with a semi-circular opening shape, and has a sashed semi-circular transom and sashed, flush light side panels. The homes most notable features on the façade are the bay dormer tower and dormer gable window on the opposite side. Above the round double hung windows with transoms are arch radiating voussoirs. The brickwork is stretcher bond and the sides of the home have brick quoins for decoration. The home has projecting verges and deep overhanging eaves.


Notes

  1. Smith, Carolyn. Personal Interview, July 2016.
  2. home.cogeco.ca. "Bigger_Biggar Families (includes Marshall, Rymal, Pettit and Smith)," retrieved July 2016.

References

  • Smith, Carolyn. (July 2016). Personal Interview.
  • home.cogeco.ca. (n.d.). "Bigger_Biggar Families (includes Marshall, Rymal, Pettit and Smith)," retrieved July 2016.