County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Phelps/Guest House


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:

Summary

Located on the Phelps tract, a 1200 acre parcel of land granted by Joseph Brant to Epaphras Lord Phelps in 1804, the Phelps-Guest house was originally built in the 1840s. The original stone home has received two significant additions: a board and batten addition at the rear of the building and an Italinate addition added to the front.


Timeline

1804 – Phelps Tract Granted to Epaphras Lord Phelps

The Phelps Tract was granted by Epaphras Lord Phelps by Joseph Brant.

184? – Phelps/Guest House Constructed

Stone house is built be descendants of Epaphras Lord Phelps.

1876 – Italianate Addition Added to Front of House

1900? – Veranda Added to Home


Summary of Inhabitants

Epaphras Lord Phelps

While not an inhabitant of this home, Epaphras Lord Phelps is important due to the fact that he was granted the land where the house is located by Joseph Brant in 1804. Originally a school teacher from the United States, Phelps taught at schools in Long Point, Blenheim and in Brant's Mohawk village. From 1800 to 1812, he was Joseph Brant's white secretary but was forced to flee to the United States after advising Brant to stay neutral during the War of 1812.


Architectural Features

The new front part of the house was built in 1876. The original house was board and batten while the older middle section was built with ballast and timbers. The ballast was brought back on ships going up the river and returning from hauling wheat. The veranda was added around the turn of the 20th century. The foundations of the home are rubble and pharge. 1


Notes

  1. Guest, Linda. Phelps/Guest House. Personal interview. 10 Aug. 2015.

References

  • Guest, Linda. Phelps/Guest House. Personal interview. 10 Aug. 2015.

Date of Publication:
1840
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
2015CB005
Collection:
Historic Buildings of the County of Brant
Language of Item:
English
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Phelps/Guest House. County of Brant Public Library, Item No. 2015CB005.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

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Phelps/Guest House



Summary

Located on the Phelps tract, a 1200 acre parcel of land granted by Joseph Brant to Epaphras Lord Phelps in 1804, the Phelps-Guest house was originally built in the 1840s. The original stone home has received two significant additions: a board and batten addition at the rear of the building and an Italinate addition added to the front.


Timeline

1804 – Phelps Tract Granted to Epaphras Lord Phelps

The Phelps Tract was granted by Epaphras Lord Phelps by Joseph Brant.

184? – Phelps/Guest House Constructed

Stone house is built be descendants of Epaphras Lord Phelps.

1876 – Italianate Addition Added to Front of House

1900? – Veranda Added to Home


Summary of Inhabitants

Epaphras Lord Phelps

While not an inhabitant of this home, Epaphras Lord Phelps is important due to the fact that he was granted the land where the house is located by Joseph Brant in 1804. Originally a school teacher from the United States, Phelps taught at schools in Long Point, Blenheim and in Brant's Mohawk village. From 1800 to 1812, he was Joseph Brant's white secretary but was forced to flee to the United States after advising Brant to stay neutral during the War of 1812.


Architectural Features

The new front part of the house was built in 1876. The original house was board and batten while the older middle section was built with ballast and timbers. The ballast was brought back on ships going up the river and returning from hauling wheat. The veranda was added around the turn of the 20th century. The foundations of the home are rubble and pharge. 1


Notes

  1. Guest, Linda. Phelps/Guest House. Personal interview. 10 Aug. 2015.

References

  • Guest, Linda. Phelps/Guest House. Personal interview. 10 Aug. 2015.