County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
1951 Oliver Standard 77


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
The Oliver 77 came in three different models: standard, row crop, and orchard. This particular tractor is the standard model which sat in a fence row for 20 years before it was purchased and restored. There was a huge wasp nest filling the top of the motor which might have actually prevented the engine from rusting. Much of the body however was rusted as can be seen by the pitted surface. The rear wheel rims were also extremely rusted due to the tires being filled with calcium chloride and subsequently leaking, a practice commonly undertaken to add more weight for more stability and traction. The side panels gave the tractor a sleek design however they were often removed by farmers to prevent the engine from overheating.
Date of Publication:
2014
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
2014CB004
Collection:
Farm Implements of Burford Township
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.0834 Longitude: -80.49968
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
1951 Oliver Standard 77, 2014. County of Brant Public Library, Photograph No. 2014CB004.017.
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










1951 Oliver Standard 77


The Oliver 77 came in three different models: standard, row crop, and orchard. This particular tractor is the standard model which sat in a fence row for 20 years before it was purchased and restored. There was a huge wasp nest filling the top of the motor which might have actually prevented the engine from rusting. Much of the body however was rusted as can be seen by the pitted surface. The rear wheel rims were also extremely rusted due to the tires being filled with calcium chloride and subsequently leaking, a practice commonly undertaken to add more weight for more stability and traction. The side panels gave the tractor a sleek design however they were often removed by farmers to prevent the engine from overheating.