County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
Annual Report of the Women's Missionary Society
:


Description
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Pamphlets
Description:
This is the Eighth Annual Report of the Women's Missionary Society of the Presbyterian Church in Canada.
The original document was provided by the South Dumfries Historical Society.
Date of Original:
1923
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
2011SD097
Collection:
South Dumfries Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.2501 Longitude: -80.24966
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Annual Report of the Women's Missionary Society, 1923. South Dumfries Historical Society, 1999.60.23.
Terms of Use:
The information and images provided are for personal research only and are not to be used for commercial purposes. Use of this information should include the credit "South Dumfries Historical Society."
Contact
County of Brant Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

County of Brant Public Library (Paris Branch)
12 William Street
Paris, ON
N3L 1K7 | @brantlibrary

Full Text

'THE WORLD

FOR CHRIST

EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

Ontario Provincial

Women's Missionary

Society

Presbyterian Church in Canada

1923

Report of Ontario Provincial Board Womens Missionary Society for 1922

NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF ONTARIO PROVINCIAL RECORDING SECRETARY

The Ninth Annual Report of the Ontario Provincial W.M.S. Executive is full of the joy brought by the accomplishment of a difficult object, the clearing of the deficit. The wheels of our chariot draw heavily with this encumbrance above them, lightened of it, we look forward to a year of great achivement in 1923.

The monthly meetings of Executive Committee have been well attended, Two meetings of the Provincial Executive have been held, October 3 ana 4, 1922, and January 25-26, 1923. A full docket of business was carried through each time.

We report a change in our place of meeting. Prom May, 1914, tc December, 1922, we met in Bloor Street Church, and had begun to feel ourselves trespassers on the kindness of this most hospitable congregation. One day a month was set aside for us, but when we needed two dayb we were in the way, despite the efforts made to make us feel that there was plenty of room for all. Therefore we applied to the Session and management of St. Paul's Church, Bathurst Street, for accommodation in their spacious new Community House. We met with a delightfully warm welcome and there we shall continue to meet for some time to come. The Auxiliary of St. Paul's entertained us at luncheon on the occasion of our Executive Meeting, January 25th, the President, Mrs-Maclntyre, in her speech of greeting, telling us we were made "free of their premises.77

At our October meeting we had the pleasure of hearing Mrs. A, E. Armstrong tell of her travels in our foreign fields, and at the luncheon mentioned above, Mrs. Kipp, Hospital Secretary of Council, told us oi conditions in the north of Ontario, of Matheson and specially of the new hospital at Hearst now being made ready for use.

Each year as it comes brings the request, "Stress the work amongst the young/7 Our first duty is to them, that they should be brought up in the 'i nurture and admonition of the Lord,' that they may fill these places when they come to them better than we ever did. Another point we would very specially commend to you is the "Every woman a member" slogan for 1923. Our Lord's parting word wTas "make disciples of all."

JESSIE A. BEGG,

Kecording Secretary.

TREASURER'S STATEMENT OF THE ONTARIO PROVINCIAL WOMEN'S MISSIONARY SOCIETY

Herewith is submitted the statement of moneys received from the Province of Ontario during the year 1922.

The total sum received was $248,42,6.44, being an increase of $22,314.48, or slightly over 9%% increase.

The Annual Meeting held at Ottawa April 1922 authorized the Provincial Board Executive to deduct, if necessary, from the General Fund enough money to bring their Expense Fund to 1%% of 1921 givings, amount being $3,391.67.

The amount deducted for the Provincial Board's Expenses was $1,803.45.

Bemittances were made as follows: March. To Mrs. Ross, re. Inter-denominational Prayer Meeting

at Allistoii................................................................................ $ 5.70

To General Treasurer..........................................................„ 5,818.81

April............................................................................................................ 10,500.00

May............................................................................................................ 15,705.00

June............................................................................................................ 14,137.71

July............................................................................................................. 26,821.48

September.................................................................................................. 3,825.02

October........................................................................................................ 25,486.81

November.................................................................................................. 25,488.61

December.................................................................................................... 19,967.52

January...................................................................................................... 98,866.33

$246,622.99 To Provincial Board's Expenses.......................................... 1,803.45

$248,426.44

Included in the moneys received were the following gifts: Chatham—

Bidgetown Excelsior Bible Class re Bible Woman for Miss

Weir, India................................................................................ $40.00

Mizpah Bible Glass—St. Luke's, Ealeigh, Korea.................... 7.00

Maitland—

Collection from Three Mission Band Eallies for Happy Childhood...............................................................................!.............. 24.18

Owen Sound— ......

Miss Lenny, re Bible Woman in India..............................-.......... 55.00

Sarnia—

Girls Athletic Club of Mooreline Township, re support of

a famine child in Honan, China.......................................... 25.00.

Toronto—

St. Andrew's Church Auxiliary, King Street. A Memorial to their Deaconess, Miss Georgina Wiley, to be sent to Mrs. J. F. Mackay, Central India, for Christian Literature for India............................................................................ 500.00

Bloor Street Y.W., re. Miss McEwen's expenses to conference 25.00

"In Memory of Mr. F. H. Boss" from Mrs. Boss.................... 25.00

Paris—

From Iiigersoll re. School Homes.................................................> 25.00

Temiskaming—

Ee. Eobertson Memorial..........................................................•..... 25.65

Collection at St. Thomas Summer School per Mrs. Locheed.... 6;50

$758.33

TOTAL AMOUNT RECEIVED FROM PRESBYTERIALS

Algoma...................................$ 1,059.78

Barrie.................................... 8,918.81

Brockville .....................-........ 4,726.27

Bruce ....................................... 3,888.58

Chatham................................ 10,439.06

Glengarry.............................. 12,701.74

Guelph.................................... 9,447.50

Hamilton.............................. 22,685.48

Huron .................................... 8,688.13

Kingston................................ 5.663.53

Lanark and Eeiifrew.......... 12,392.00

Lindsay .................................. 5,723.72

London.................................. 14,306.11

Maitland.............................. 6,822.00

North Bay ............................ 2,001.21

Orangeville............................. 3,917.51

Ottawa .................................. 14,495.48

Owen Sound.......................... 5,972.56

Paris...................................... 8,447.36

Peterboro.............................. 7,763.83

Sarnia,.................................. 8,196.44

Saugeen.................................. 3,642.96

Hamilton, Out., 28th Feb., 1923.

Correct: CHAS. P. HARDY, Auditor.

Stratford .............................. 7,990.70

Superior ...........;.................... 1,732.30

T'emiskaming ........................ 907.77

Toronto .................................. 50,519.72

Whitby.................................. 4,988.41

Kagawong ................................ 29.25

Sudbury Auxiliary ............... 239.38

Sudbury Mission 'Band ........ 15.00

Gore Bay .................................. 22.00

Copper 'Cliff .......................... 15.25

Girls' Athletic Club, Moor-line Township.................... 25.00

Collection at St. Thomas Summer School, per Mrs.

Locheed ........................... 6.50

Collection at Inter-denominational Prayer Meeting at

Alliston................................ 5.70

Anonymous .............................. 30.00

Balance from 1921 ............ .03

$248,426.44 SOPHIE M. GAULD.

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL BOARD'S EXPENSE FUND Receipts

Annual Meeting Collections ....................................................................$ 253.01

Sale of W.M.S. Banners ............................................................................ 30.00

Eefund Canadian Passenger Association ............................ $25.00

Refund Corresponding Secretary re typing......A................. 1.20

Refund Rev. Mr. McLeod....................'.................................. 10.00

-----------. 36.20

Bank Interest.............................................................................................. 8.42

iy2% of 1921 Givings April 25th.......................................... 1,500.00

iy2% of 1921 Givings July 26th ........................................ 800.00 2,300.00

$2,627.63

Expenditure

Officers' Expenses .......................................... $282.15

Officers' Railway Expense to Board and

Annual Meetings, April.............................. $338.80

Do. October .................................................... 80.78

Do, January .................................................... 69.80

$489.38

Presbyterial Presidents to Annual Meeting 471.50 Speakers and W.M.S. General Executive

Members to Annual Meeting...................... 103.10

Missionaries........................................................ 55.40

1,119.38

Armac Press........................................................ 361.87

Robt. Raw $8.00; Poole £ McCullough $5.25;

A. E. Taylor $25.00; Pratt & Son $4.75;

W. J. Gage & Co. $16.48............................ 59.48

Summer Schools: Mrs. Locheed; Mrs. Gollan 36.80

Provincial Board Officers to Meetings........

W. M. S. Publications....................................

O. R. E. C..........................................................

Tea to General Council..................•...................

Advance to Canadian Passenger Association

Taxis and Florist............................................

Church Caretakers, Ottawa............................

Toronto............................

Stenographer......................................................

Nominating Committee.................,...........,......

Telegrams ............................................................

Sefund to General Account

25.00 5.00

3.56 .74

Hamilton, Ont.,, 28th Feb., 1923.

Correct: CHAS. P. HAEDY, Auditor

66.00

11,10

4.00

100.00

25.00

13.00

25.00 18.00

4.30

$2,131.08 496.55

$2,627.63 $2.627.63 SOPHIE M. GAULD.

1922

FORWARD MOVEMENT ACCOUNT Receipts

February, Balance 011 hand ........................................

Bank Interest .

Expenditures

1922 April Mrs. Haddow ............................................ $ 2.99

October, Mrs. Haddow.......................................... 22.21

$301.46 15.59

$317.05

Balance 011 hand

25.20

$291.85

$317.05

SOPHIE M. GAULD.

Hamilton, Ont., 28th Feb., 1923.

Correct: CHAS. P. HAEDY, Auditor.

AMOUNT MENTIONED FOR DEFICIT

Brockville ................................ $495.65

Bruce........................................ 389.80

Chatham .................................. 1469.53

Glengarry.................................. 8.15

Guelph......................................1,213.47

Hamilton .................................. 138.65

Huron ......................................., 221.00

Kingston .................................. 564.53

Lanark & Renfrew ............."... 149.83

London ......................................1,346.56

Lindsay.................................... 32.00

Orangeville.............................. 65.55

Owen Sound............................ 536.85

Paris .......................................... 592.78

Sarnia ...................................... 245.24

Saugeeii .................................... 158.75

Superior.................................... 79.00

T'emiskaming............................ 164.90

Toronto ....................................6,711.15

Whitbv.................................... 834.50

$15,417.89 Toronto contribution should

be ........................................ $3,903.12

Making total.................... $12,609.86

REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE

The first duty of the Finance Committee after the Annual Meeting held in Ottawa, was to appoint a convenor to take the place of Mrs. Rae, who had so ably opened up this new department under the Provincial Board.

This Committee had been formed to educate us how to so plan out our financial work, that we might raise the necessary amount to meet our estimates each year.

Your Committee are glad to report, that what appeared to be a difficult task at the beginning, after one year's faithful study, seems to be taking more definite shape.

In May a circular letter was sent to all Presbyterial Finance Committees notifying them of their share of the deficit, and asking that returns be made monthly through the ordinary channels, at the same time the Committee recommended:

1. That all funds from the Province pass through the hands of the Provincial Treasurer.

2. That Presbyterial Finance Committees keep in close, touch with Auxiliary Finance Committees reporting back to Provincial Finance Committee.

3. That Finance Committees make a study of the "systematic giving" leaflet where possible, adapting the method to local conditions.

4. That all unnecessary expenses be curtailed.

About the middle of September, as the auxiliaries approached their Thankoffering season, it was deemed advisable to send another letter tc Presbyterials drawing attention to this fact, and also asking members to give systematically as God had prospered them.

During all these months the money had been coming steadily in, about $8,000 of the revenue earmarked "deficit." This $8,000 really represented the advance made over last year. In November "A Nine Months' Survey'* was suggested to Presbyterials, also introducing the "Leaflets on newly-formed Finance Committees/' and drawing attention to a "Final Appeal77 that would appear in the December "Messenger.J ' The year is now-about to close and the result of our work will be tabulated in figures; whether we reach our objective or not remains to be seen, but we feel that whether we do or not, we have achieved results along the line of education, which was one of the aims of this committee at its inception.

We have learned

1st. Through how many channels our letters have to go before they reach our tiniest mission band members.

2nd. What a length of time it takes for them to reach said member.

3rd. How necessary to start early in the year in the work towards our objective.

4th. That we hope to reach our objective if we make careful plans, under God's guidance.

A "questionnaire' was sent down to Presby-terials early in January asking to what extent Finance Committees had been formed in auxiliaries, to what extent the systematic giving by envelope had been adopted and to what extent financial obectives had been reached.

Finance Committees have been formed in 21 of the 27 Presbyterials.

Twelve of these Finance convenors sent replies to the "questionnaire.-" Replies were also received from Lindsay, Paris, Temiskaming, and North .Bay Presbyterials and Sudbury auxiliary.

Reports were not in from all auxiliaries, so it was impossible to receive definite figures from all, but all showed a very keen interest in the financial work for which they are responsible. A spirit of gratitude to our Heavenly Father for His blessing in the past, and a looking forward to much better things in the future, was the hope expressed in all the replies.

A desire for more education along the line of "systematic giving by envelope," so that if the members could not attend the meetings regularly they could help with their offering was also expressed by several.

Temiskaming and Toronto Presbyterials went "over the top" of the allocation sent out by Provincial Board, February, 1922.

All Presbyterials made a healthy increase with the exception of four, and the loss in these instances was slight, only amounting in all to a little over $400.00. No doubt there was good reason for the shortage.

The Provincial returns for 1922 are now tabulated and the Province of Ontario made the splendid increase of $22,314.48. over last year—nearly 10%.

Finance Committees as a general rule have not been formed in the different auxiliaries. Peterboro and Toronto rank highest in the new policy. Envelopes are used in some way in nearly every auxiliary, but the systematic giving by weekly envelope is only in its introduction. Where it has been used it has had marked results in increased giving. There are many suggestions appended to the reports. Some Presbyterials do not care for allocations. In all cases the desire is to have the allocation sent down early.

Two Presbyterials think too much money is spent in representation to Provincial and Council meetings. One Presbyterial desires a deeper realization of the importance of the work, to give more and give regularly, and still another suggests that we be more earnest in prayer, and that we adopt Bible readings on Tithing and Giving.

It is just by these little suggestions that we see how deeply interested our women are in the work of the W..M.S., and it has been by the united. efforts of every Auxiliary member, every Y. W. Auxiliary member, every Mission Band and C.G-.I.T. group, that Ontario has been able to reach the place she did.

And just before closing a word to the Treasurers who make out the report forms. Our thanks are due them for their labor at such a busy time of the year, when every moment for one's self counts. Your Committee would submit the following resolutions:

1st. Thanksgiving to our Heavenly Father for so wonderfully blessing us in the year just closed.

2nd. A more earnest desire on the part of all members "to give as God hath prospered us.-"

3rd. To have every woman in the congregation a member of the W, M. S.

4th. Systematic giving by weekly or monthly envelope.

5th. Education along the line of allocations to each Presbyterial.

6th. The name of the Financial Convenor of each Presbyterial printed in the Blue Book.

Respectfully submitted,

(Mrs. Jas.) BELL LITSTER,

Secretary of Finance,

REPORT OF BANNER DEPARTMENT. 1922

The Banner Department has been carrying on its work in the usual way during the year 1922. Fewer orders were received than in the previous year, due probably, to the fact that many churches are already supplied and that so many of our societies have been bending every energy to meet our financial necessities.

During the year a leaflet entitled "W.M.S. Banner," was prepared and printed. One or more of these is enclosed with each banner sent out, as a suggestion regarding its aim, presentation and use. A number of these leaflets are in the hands of our Literature Secretary, so that she may send them out with the parcels of literature to the various Presbyterials.

Your Secretary has answered several letters asking for information re competitive banners, etc. Attention has been drawn in each case to the fact that our provincial banner is not for competition, but is available for any of our societies. Competitive banners are arranged by the Presbyterials wishing to obtain them,, at their own cost and according to the basis they may decide upon.

s;

We hope that during this year many of our organizations which have not yet seen their way clear to procure one of our banners, may do so and thus lift before the eyes of the people our motto: " The World for Christ,"

(Mrs.) ANNIE CRANSTON,

Banner Secretar}^.

REPORT OF PAGEANT SECRETARY, 1922

For the past year the costumes supplied for pageant work have been:

The native dress of the Women of China, Korea, South American Indian^ India and the Purdah dress of the Mohammedan woman.

These were made use of by a large number of leaders and were greatly appreciated.

The Pageant work is growing to be a very interesting part of presentation of the work among the young, and seems to appeal to the band members as so many leaders reported such good results from their presenting of the different Pageants.

Also several used this as a means of augmenting their funds. One of our brave leaders in the northland used this means of gathering together again her forces who had suffered from the fire. And her Pageant was a very successful one.

A number of young girls demonstrated the use of costumes in Mission Bank work at the large Religious Educational Gathering held in Bloor St. Church and proved of great interest to the delegates.

The work is growing rapidly and holds much of what may appeal to our young members. As many opportunities present themselves for using their ingenuity in constructing the different costumes, one leader after renting the set reported that the Band thought it advisable to create a set of costumes for their own use.

From the fact that so many different Pageants are used and in most cases no two sets of costumes are alike, it has been rather difficult for your Board to meet the demand.

(Mrs. R. J.) JEAN B. McLEAN,

Pageant Secretary.

REPORT OF THE ONTARIO EXCHANGE SECRETARY FOR 1922

The 3 ear 1921 has been the banner year as regards paper sent out, two hundred and seventy-five (275) having been loaned during 1922, as against one hundred and thirty-nine (139) in. 1921. Fifty-eight letters and cards have been written besides those going with the papers, and very few parcels are sent without a note enclosed. There are still too many papers returned without even a memorandum telling who is returning them, and it -is difficult to tell whence they come. A good many are sent back without the postage, and many still send postage when writing for, instead of when returning them, sometimes too much, more frequently not enough, though there is much improvement in both respects. Twn parcels have been lost in the mail when being returned, in one case the papers were returned in very bad order, in another they were wi\i«eii 101 twice, bur 110 notice was taken. Usually they are returned promptly, many with notes of sincere appreciation saying how much they had been enjoyed. One said, "If you only knew what a boon the Exchange is to the small struggling Auxiliaries, like ours." Fewer JIP-V papers have been received this year, but we hope to have some good new ones 011 the next list. Each time the list is put in the Messenger there is a greater demand for papers. A number of ladies preparing papers for their own meetings, have sent for ours to get facts, but we have not got many of theirs for the Exchange, though a few have kindly responded to our request for them.

9

We have been told that in many of the auxiliaries an effort is being made to get the members to speak on 'a subject instead of reading a paper. That is t>eyond all question the best way to interest an audience. But to give a good address, one requires to be thoroughly familiar with all the facts, much more so than in writing a paper, as you must remember them, so that it would not require much effort to write them. Would it not be time well spent if it would help others'? Others have not the time to search out the facts or, living in small places, have not facilities possessed by those living in large ones ana do not come in contact with those conversant with them. You know added opportunities bring added responsibility. Occasionally a paper for some reason cannot be used at the meeting for which it was provided or someone hearing it may wish to have it for another meeting. So long as the papers are being made use of that is all right, that i§ what they are for, the objection is that they should be lying idle while others are needing them, but in such cases a card should be sent to the Secretary, explaining this, as the only way she has of knowing that the parcel has been received is its prompt return. Our sincere thanks are tendered to the Editor of the Messenger for putting the lists in the Messenger, and to those friends who helped us to get new papers. We hope that this year there may be no lack of either workers or parcels but that it may be a year of solid growth and prosperity in every branch of the W. M. S.

MAEY A, HOPKIEK,

Asst. Provincial Secretary Exchange.

1922 REPORT OF FORWARD MOVEMENT CONVENOR FOR ONTARIO.

Results of Forward Movement efforts cannot be tabulated. Some efforts have been systematically carried on but there is much to be yet overtaken. The new posters acompanied by Guide Posts were sent out, and in many cases, but by no means all, have been put to their intended use, that is, presented to Presbyterial Auxiliary, Y. W. Auxiliary, Bands and to Congregations. The Guide Posts proved most helpful to speakers and can still be used as up-to-date information apart from poster presentation.

In many sections of the Province Missionary Pageants have been used to advantage as a means of imparting information as well as for revenue. Eegret that the demand for use of slides has practically ceased, and their usefulness has been by no means exhausted.

The world wide Day of Prayer in January was observed, but was not as general as one could desire, many seeming not anxious to observe both world wide day and interdenominational day. Can we have too much prayer for missions? Surely not.

Would call attention again to W.M.S. Sunday. This day has been granted us by Assembly, for the presentation of W.M.S. work, but all o;ir Ontario pastors do not yet see fit to allow the privilege granted.

Systematic study throughout the Province is not all that one could desire, as all our Auxiliaries do not use the i

It may be of interest to some at least to show comparisons, since beginning Forward Movement activities.

Eeport 1918 1919 1920 1921 Inc.

No. Auxiliaries.... 859 876 896 891 15% %

No. Y.W. Aux.. . 46 81 92 1337 15%%

No. Bands ...... 534 554 584 575 9 2-5-%

Novof members 37,034 42,161 43,548 46,852 26%%

Givings ... $146,391.01 $118,815.97 205,567.26 $227,396.40 55%%

and our objective was a five-fold increase in membership and in givings.

10

It is estimated we have 43,000 Presbyterian families in Ontario; to secure a mother and a child in each family a member gives us a recruiting ground of at least 86,000. Our total membership for 1921 was 46,852, practically 54%%. Have we not fallen short?

If you have a task to do,

'Start right in and see it through,

Keep your purpose well in sight And your faith and honor bright, Do it right.

So whatever be your task

Do not think the world will ask How much talent you possessed

What you used will be the test. Do your best.

INDIVIDUAL EFFORTS IN W. M. S. FOR 1923. MORE WVM.S. Members.

Every woman and child an interested worker or a Home Helper. "Tell a woman," "Bring a woman," "Secure at least one woman.'7 MORE Bible Ctudy.

Enrich your life daily through Bible Study. Prove its promises. Love it more. Use it more. MORE Prayer.

In the Home—In the Auxiliary—By the individual, by sentence, group or topic prayer, specialize for immediate needs. MORE Knowledge of W.M.S. and its activities. Study conditions in the Home Land. Study conditions in the Foreign Lands.

Find out their problems, their needs. Then find out your responsibility. Use slides—Use Charts—Use Pageants. SERVICE means finding Something to do and doing it.

"UNITED» WE "STAND—"DIVIDED" WE "FALL."

(Mrs.) E. E. KETCHEK,

President. H. E. HADDOW,

Secretary.

HOME HELPERS REPORT, 1922

We are pleased to report 9,778 Home Helpers in connection with our Auxiliaries, 244 in our Y.W.A. and 421 in our Mission Bands, making a total of 10,443 Home Helpers in -the Province of Ontario. This, I think, is a good showing as in many cases whole Departments are being taken into the membership through the use of the duplex enlevope, but we are pleased to report that in many cases where the duplex envelopes are being used our Department is still retained. In some cases contributions otf the Home Helpers are not kept separate, while in others, where system is shown in the Auxiliary, our Department not only use the duplex envelope but they are given credit for their contributions. This we think is the ideal way.

The average contribution is about the same as last year, $1.25. The total amount, however, is larger, being $12,657.39.

If all of our Secretaries put as much of themselves into the work as half of them do, our Department would go forward by leaps and bounds. In "Home Helpers7 Year" we hope to interest more of our women in the work of our Society. To make the Auxiliary feel its responsibility for the success of the Department;, to hold those of our young women who cannot attend meetings; to present the claims of our Branch through the columns of our Missionary Messenger, to which 2,885 Home Helpers

11

subscribe, and to do all we can to pass on our Home Helpers to full membership, filling up the ranks with those who up to this time have shown no interest in our \V,M.S. is our aim.

Home Helpers in Auxiliaries ................................................................ 9778

Home Helpers in Y.M.A....................................................................... 244

Home Helpers in M.B......................................................................... 421

Membership................................................................................................ 10,443

Contribution...............................................................,............................... $12,911.36

Home Helpers who subscribe to Missionary Messenger................ 2885

Home Helpers who joined Auxiliary this year................................ ' . 476

ALICE MILNE,

•Ont. H. H. Sec'y-

REPORT OF LIBRARY SECRETARY, 1922.

1922 stands out as one of the most successful years in the history of this department—for many Presbyterials a splendid record of faithful work on the part of Secretaries and loyal response from members. Specific needs are better understood. The output is classified to suit varying conditions. Send us what you like best yourselves. The magazines and papers that you welcome and read in your own homes are what we want, too. The book that helps your boy will help the lonely lad out here. This is the call that comes to us and we are all the time learning to understand it better—quality is what counts and is the secret of success. The Secretary for Toronto suggests the motto for 1923 be: The Best is None Too Good. Can we adopt that?

A WTirld without books! A life with nothing to read! Try and think what it would be. But do not end by only thinking, do something and help to fill the need within your owrn province. This, in few words, is the story of the Library Department.

The reports for 1922 include supplies to Settlers7 and Soldiers' Settlement Homes, Camps and Club Rooms, Sabbath School Libraries, literature for young people and for junior clubs, S.S. papers to districts and families where 'Sabbath School is not possible, letters and literature for the sick and lonely, packages of booklets, Gospels, reading suitable for the shut-ins go direct by mail or are enclosed with other supplies; Sunday reading for hospitals and homes within the Presbyterial, not forgetting the Isolation Hospital, where cards, magagines and S.S. papers are welcomed; Pulpit Bibles, Toronto alone sent four fine Pulpit Bibles; Bibles and Testaments for prizes in Sunday and in day schools; District Nurses; the Indians on reserves; and in addition, new avenues are constantly opening. Lindsay reports distributing literature on the steamers during summer travel, and at summer resorts; Hymnals (former version) have as usual gone out in large numbers-—Glengarry sent many. The little Summer Sunday School in Algoma is a yearly charge, and there are small children in that lonely part who watch for the mail man as he passes up the road to see if he does leave at teacher 7s door the weekly budget that means so much to them. The fire-swept district has been much in mind, many societies having given timely help there. One Presbyterial (Stratford) has divided into three sections for better oversight of the work. There are many ways in which the Finnish people can be helped, and those at Copper Cliff are well cared for by the London Society—indeed, every effort is made to reach the foreigner. Ottawa distributes fifty copies of Happy Childhood, the Chinese children's paper, in the Chinese Sunday School. The Superintendent says the children are pleased and smiling to have something in their own tongue. The Italian children of All Peoples' Mission, Sault Ste. Marie, in charge of Miss Staples, our Deaconess, in addition to usual supplies, have had a number of illustrated Italian Gospels; Guelph has care of the Italian Mission at Ivelso. It is not easy to give exact figures where quantities are sent,

but Ottawa reports 375 books and Bibles, and 3,700 magazines, not including Hymnals and Sabbath School and other papers.

The year has been marked by increasing interest and help from Young Women's Bands, some C.G.I.T. groups are helping too; Toronto, with the large work that Society is undertaking, reports as one of the chief encouragements this help of our young people. While some societies can send out more than others, there has been more done within Presbyterial bounds. Books on Missions from the Literature Department are circulated and studied. This, of course, comes under the head of the Literature Department, but touches our department too, for later they are sent out to isolated parts. An illustration of how the various departments of our Wj.M.S. fit into and supplement one the other: There are at home districts where there is little good reading, and Sabbath Schools with indifferent libraries; if we cultivate the pass-on' spirit we will see need all about us that is along the line of our own work. 'e Increasing Interest,' " More Care in Selection' come from many societies; it is like an echo, and is the keynote of the year ?s work.

There is more we might have done—will Presbyterials gather all the time, so when the call comes there is no delay—remember students are only on the fields for the summer months, and some of those districts have had no one in charge during the winter—all the more reason for no delay. We want to supply them as soon as they are settled and know what is required. This means gathering and censoring ahead. Yes, there is more we might have done. Let us not be satisfied with comparing this year with last year's results, but rather compare it by the standard of our highest ideals of what is possible, wdiat this Library Department may come to mean to our Church and our land if each one of us did l c As She Could.'

Respectfully submitted,

(Mrs. J. J.) A. BELL,

Ontario Library Secretary.

REPORT OF LIFE MEMBERSHIP SECRETARY, 1922

It is gratifying to note the increase in the number of In Memoriam and Junior Certificates over the past year, for it shows that in either joy or sorrow the members are thinking of our mission cause, as a means of thanksgiving to God.

Several Junior Memberships have been sent to the children of missionaries, and while last year your Secretary had the pleasure of sending Life Membership Certificates to eight Bible women in Korea, this year she has sent several to Argentine, United States, China, India and Formosa as well. I am glad to be able to report a slight increase over last year. There were 65 more certificates issued and the revenue was augmented by $185.

Life Memberships issued •................860 netting $21,500

Junior Memberships....................509 2,545

In Memoriam . ...........114 » 2,850

Total......... . ..'................ 1483 26,895

(Mrs. Findlay) ADA F. MATHESON,

Stratford, January llth, 1923. L. M. Secretary,

REPORT OF LITERATURE DEPARTMENT.

The reports from the Presbyterial Literature Secretaries show unflagging activity, giving evidence of greater interest.

Two Presbyterials had confused Library and Literature work—we hope that they now understand the difference in these departments and this year will be able to interest Auxiliary in Literature.

Toronto and Stratford did not report but surely they have been active.

A Literature Secretary visited the Presbytery, told of the Literature and Messenger, asking the co-operation of the ministers.

13

A few of the successful departures that were carried out:

Two ladies visit hospitals every month and take Literature with them; and several have placed literature in Nurses' Homes.

In a large Presbyterial, our Study Book Mission Band, study book and the duties of each Auxiliary Secretary's department were provided to every Auxiliary, asking them to use them, pay for them, or return them. Only three were returned.

At one Presbyterial, the bulk of literature sold was for Mission Band work. Both supply and demand are steadily increasing.

I would call your attention to our Children's Books. There is a wealth of these and the reasons for buying missionary books for children are so evident that it hardly seems necessary to urge you to Look and Buy.

The Home Life in China, India, Korea, Japan, Mexico, Persia and Syria cannot fail to arouse interest in the child's mind.

Two books for boys: "Canadian. Heroes of Mission Fields Overseas" and a "Noble Arum." Dr. MacVicar, Honan, thanks his parents for having placed in his hands when a boy Missionary literature. It cannot be too often repeated that good books are life teachers and children's missionary books not only give entertainment but the best inspiration.

Our pagents: One day in India; Afternoon in Chinese Hospital, and The Pill Box, have been given. The arrangements for such Missionary entertainment as well as the information gained and interest aroused in its preparation, will help visualize missionaries and their work..

Our new study book, Building the Nation, is a feast of good things and I would remind you that you will gain a great deal of information and assistance by the use of suggestions to leaders, which was issued with the chief object of helping present the material in the best way.

The following publications were sent out to each Presbyterial Literature Secretary: Dr. Chone Oliver's address given at Gait; The Five Inns; the Grift of the Loving Heart; Our Sisters in Need; Guideposts; Information on Supplies; Duties of Newly-Formed Finance Committees; C.G.I.T. and Mission Band Programmes, also 3,000 copies , of the Eighth Annual Eeport of the Ontario Provincial.

The purpose of this literature has been to promote missionary knowledge and stimulate missionary interest.

Provincial, Presbyterial and Sectional Sales for 1922 amounted to $1202.63 —$40 in advance of last year.

Auxiliary Literature Secretaries have been steadily increasing. Whitby, every Auxiliary but one with a Literature Secretary. Only one Presbyterial reports that it is impossible to interest Auxiliaries in literature.

No one is interested in a subject of which she is ignorant. Literature Secretaries, inform yourselves, interest yourselves, then interest others.

Let every Auxiliary Y. W. and Mission Band do some real mission study this year. We can no longer plead lack of information or of material; the publications exist for you—use them.

Let us strive to grow, not only in grace, but in new evidences of it; in fruitful methods for extending the knowledge of our Lord and King.

MESSENGER REPORT.

1922 closed with 26,878 subscribers to our Messenger. Out of 24 reports received, 9 report decrease and 11 increases.

The reasons for decrease—never read, when they are distributed, simply left in their seats. Some day wre may be able to report : Once there was a woman who left her Messenger in her pew!. Another reason, Presidents of Auxiliaries do not use the Messenger in their meetings; one Secretary writes: Would that I could be president of every Auxiliary in our Presbyterial and make members realize the mine of information that is in our Messenger.

14

The reasons for increase: personal canvass; aim: list equal to membership. Chatham has as its goal 1,000 subscribers for 1923; Bruce has one Auxiliary with 40 new subscribers.

Let us have as our slogan for 1923: Every W.M.S. member a subscriber. Then it would be easy to overcome Messenger indifference.

HANNAH LITTLP.],

Secretary.

REPORT OF THE MISSION BANDS OF ONTARIO.

In presenting the Ninth Annual Eeport of the Mission Bands the tribute I wish to pay to their worth and work, is that reflected in the fact that without exception since my tenure of office as your Provincial Secretary, they never before displayed greater vision, greater virility or greater versatility.

Though we have to note decreases in membership and finances we report a larger number of bands.

Fourteen, of the Presbyterials mention less members through the graduation of senior girls into Young Women's Auxiliaries,, or away from home attending Normal School or teaching. Thirteen regretfully record smaller contributions from a like cause. "Only the small children are now in the Mission Band, hence we find it rather more exacting to keep up our funds.' Notwithstanding this all speak in the most glowing terms of the ' worth while'J of the bands.

The vision of our members is finding expression in larger fields of front-line service. In that one of our bright, earnest workers, Miss Helen Craw, Melville church, Fergus, has entered the Medical School, Toronto, to fit herself for the work of healing in the foreign field. The Secretary says of her: l i Other girls went into the Y. W. Auxiliary, but Helen always stayed with the band." We have great pleasure in extending to her the united love and greeting of every member of the bands upon so noble a choice of a life service.

A busy pastor, visioning the possibilities of helpfulness of a group of girls pleading for a leader, laid aside all thought of the demand upon his already pre-empted time and strength and assumed the duty as well as privilege, with a renewal of the band's activity. All honor to such pastors. In another Presbyterial a band pleaded, and the leader, unable to continue through serious ill-health, appealed for some one to fill the breach, but unavailingly, and the band lapsed. Did some woman miss the vision? The answer is only too obvious. Some members of our W.M.S. have failed to regard that their obligation is not complete when they attend the meetings of the Auxiliary, but that their responsibility is greater than the requirements of the Auxiliary; and is not discharged until they have used their time, talent and endeavor to bring the children in touch,with the Life, Message and Service of the Master.

However, on the whole it is with encouragement we observe an increasingly larger interest by members of the Auxiliary as well as the greater ardency and faithfulness of many leaders, carrying on the work in some places under difficulties which less devoted hearts would deem a barrier.

Then in the number of new bands organized following those which have advanced to Young Womens, or in new fields; in associates becoming regular bands; in the resolve of some unable to continue as a separate organization though youthful, joining the Auxiliary, as well as in rallies of entire bands or conferences of leaders, in the resourcefulness which finds a time and a way of meeting, when the week-day meeting proved seemingly impracticable, adapting itself to the Sunday afternoon as not a few have done; in the systematic presenting of their gifts through freewill offerings or mite boxes; in an increased ambition to secure junior certificates and wear-pins; in the

15

ready response to take part in arranging for and conducting the meetings; in the enthusiasm with which boys preside and explain lantern slides and girls furnish music at open meetings; in the zeal with which together they study text-books, biographies and Bible stories; together with the freedom and ease in which many give travel talks or tell a story, is just an evidence of that greater virility. It may seem a far call from the orderly Thank-offering meeting where in regular order the money made by the exercise of " talent;; is laid upon the plate and at the same time the donor telling the story of the phases through which the ' 10 cents' passed ere it reached its final dimensions and goal, to the Easter gathering with each member carefully depositing in a basket an egg to augment by its monetary substitute the treasury.

The pageant, the concert, the missionary playlet, bring into exercise different faculties from the work-meeting where quilts are pieced, pictures pasted, gift bags prepared and filled by the girls; and bird houses, tops and balls made by the boys, but all serve to show that the interested minds and devoted hearts of children are alive to finding avenues of service.

Forty-two bands were organized during the year. The 601 bands and 1 associate, have a membership of 16,090 and 421 home helpers. This includes 37 life members and 532 junior members; 318 are direct subscribers to the Messenger. The amount contributed is $27,125.16.

We close the year's accomplishment with gratitude, for though we may have failed in 'some ways or means, God has not failed us, and is still beckoning us on to bigger things. "We cannot fail for ours is a winning cause.;;

AGNES M. BENNIE, Pfov. M. B. Secretary, New Hamburg, Out.

i

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL PRESS REPORT. VW' ^'UsK

In presenting the report of the department of Press and Publicity for the year 1922, your Secretary does so with a complete assurance that, because of the work done therein, the scope of Woman's Missionary activity has been enlarged, strengthened and stabilized.

As a purely Provincial effort the achievement has fallen far below the objective. The time has surely come when the pen of the Press Secretary shall be used both to blaze the trail and make straight the path for the many and varied forms of work outlined by the Board of Management, and the opportunity for so doing be that furnished by Ontario's 500 word space in the Missionary Messenger. This was the dream of the opening year. It was not realized, but it is sure to be in the years which lie ahead.

Press work as a Presbyterial activity has grown and developed marvellously. There are twenty-seven Presbyterials, all of which are doing press work of a more or less venturesome kind. They are doing it even though from too frequent change of Secretary or similar cause, a definite report does not come in. These Presbyterials which seem, not yet, to have visioned the gleam, are not many and each year they grow fewer in number.

The Presbyterial that, this year, for the first time has a real press Secretary tells of having sent reports of all Presbyterial and executive events, as well as items of interest for times and seasons, to all her County papers, and that in so doing she has been met with a courtesy and readiness on the part of the Editors that left nothing, on that score, to be desired.

Another who has been working steadily in the face of snags and adversities, speaks of her "mo-st crusty editor" as having come right to the extent of this year refusing payment for all advance notices and advertising notices of W. M. S. events.

A few Presbyterials, having long passed beyond the difficulty of securing space, are now inclined to become somewhat discouraged by inaccuracies in names and spelling on the part of type-setters and proofreader. This is

16

a form of discouragement not to be taken too seriously, however, since it is of the nature of a "growing pain'; and speaks for development .

On the other hand it is surely a cause for regret and a matter for thoughtful consideration, to discover that some press secretaries do not attend executive meetings, thus knowing intimately, and at first-hand, of all the work, plans and purposes of their Presbyterials.

In many of the larger and stronger Presbyterials the press department is now a well-organized machine, making itself felt in every smallest corner, and showing fine result in many new and unexpected ways.

Along the line of advance press work, your Secretary cannot express too warm an appreciation of the splendid and unique work being done.

It is a delight to pick up a great national daily, and see smiling from its pages the faces of our honored workers, at home and abroad. Then comes the realization: 'i This is press work, the little thing that we did not do some five or six years ago."

Have we not advanced, too, almost unconsciously! A clay does not pass but on front page or woman's page, in social organization column, one is forced to take knowledge of this W. M. S.

It is becoming almost a commonplace.

(Mrs. 'E'. F. McL.) ETHEL M. H. SMITH,

Secretary.

STRANGERS' SECRETARY'S REPORT, 1922

In submitting the Keport for the Department of the Strangers for the year ending December 31st, 1922, I wish to state that in many respects there is a very great improvement in the interest taken both in Auxiliaries an:l Presbyterials. Many Auxiliaries have had Stranger Secretaries this year, which had never had one previously. Presbyterials Secretaries for the most part are more interested also in the supervision of the work.

As usual Ottawa and Lindsay have sent in the best reports. Stratford lias only nine Auxiliaries with Stranger Secretaries, but three Auxiliary Secretaries have reported the work done.

Five Presbyterials have sent no reports, Algoma, Guelph, London, Sarnia, and Temiskaming. Therefore, as is usual, my report cannot be complete. -

Mrs. Baldwin has been most thorough in sending me quarterly statements of Ontario removals, but the Head Office statements and the Presbyterial statements do not correspond. The probable explanation is that some ministers still prefer to report direct without reference to the W.M.S. I should like to call the attention, of Presbyterial Secretaries to the heading of the report forms. Name of Presbyterial, name of Secretary, address. No fewer than three Presbytreial Secretaries sent in their forms with these spaces not filled in, and had it not been that the post marks were clear, I should have been at a loss to know whence they came. I wish also to repeat the request made when the report forms were sent out, namely, to return two of them to me, and to send a list of names and addresses of the Auxiliary Stranger Secretaries, with name of Auxiliary too. The names and addresses alone are of no use for sometimes there are two or three Auxiliaries in one town, and it is impossible to know which Secretary belongs to which Auxiliary. Several Presbyterials report that English is being taught to new Canadians and Chinese, follow-tip visits are paid to hospital patients and strangers, letters written to more who have gone to new homes or as hospital patients. Many Auxiliaries report visits to -"'shut ins" which, though not exactly work of this department, is certainly important.

17

Some work reported belongs really to the Supply Department, namely, bales of clothing, supplies of fruit, etc., sent to various destinations.

Taking it all in all there is more to encourage us in this department than there has been in the past five years.

Tabulated Statement.

Number of Auxiliaries........................................................,_. 891

Number within S. Secretaries reported................................ 438

Number reporting...................................................................... 276

Strangers reported from Head Office.........................*........2,904

Strangers reported otherwise.............................................. 935

Removals reports to Head Office .......................................... 493

Removals reports otherwise .................................................. 172

Strangers visited in new homes ............................................ 3,357

Hospital patients visited...................................................... 2.153

Letters written........................................................................ 283

Necessarily incomplete owing to inadequate reports.

E. W. MOWAT,

Secretary.

NINTH ANNUAL EEPORT OF PROVINCIAL SUPPLY DEPAKTMENT.

I am able to report another good year in this Department.

A great tribute was paid us at the Council meeting in Gait. They said no department of the W.M.S. work could go very far without the Supply Department.

Supplies were sent to the Indian Schools at Birtle, Ahousahl, Alberm, Portage la Prairie, Round Lake and Cecilia Jeffrey, also clothing and .Xmas gifts to three Indian Reserves. Supplies were sent to the Schools at Teiilon, Vegreville, Prince Albert, St. Pierre, and Point aux Trembles. We also sent to Teulon, Canora, Bonnyville, Cold Lake and Matheson, hospital supplies. Many barrels of fruit reported sent to the hospitals this year, but many were sent and not reported.. Kindly put a value on and report if fruit has been sent. Many bales of warm clothing were sent to Northern Ontario, to relieve and cheer the fire sufferers.

The total value attached to the bales shipped to the different Schools, Hospitals, and needy Mission Fields, was $31,642.93. Only two Presbyterials reported bales and fruit sent to Northern Ontario. Quite a number of Presbyterials sent bales of clothing to Toronto to be sent to Mission Fields where fire, storm, frost, hail, grasshoppers, etc., had destroyed the crops of many sections in the West and Northern Ontario.

We are only too glad to give of our abundance to these people. We ia our sheltered homes know nothing of the hardship these people undergo, and our Missionary's heart is cheered when he receives the message, "a bale is on its way/7 The gifts of clothing to these needy people demonstrate the practical side of Christianity. ' Our bales build fires in cold rooms."

.From the many letters of thanks received, one might well take /'Quilts" as a text. One says, "the tears were not very far away from some men's eyes!" Patched quilts were a familiar sight in their old mothers' homes. When one bale was being distributed, an old lady said, "I gave $2.00 at our Thank Offering, and I thought I should have bought my granddaughter a dress, but now the Lord has provided for her.?'

At the Council meeting a great tribute was paid • to the work done by many Public School teachers. One of these writes us: "Please accept my thanks for the Xmas gifts, I have in this school Finns, Russians, G-alleians, French, Welsh, Polish and Austrians, and they cannot very well express themselves in English."

18

One worker said, "Fifteen families have been helped, and one of the men remarked: There is nothing small about the women who made these quilts.77

May I close with some items of news that come to us from one of

our workers, telling of conditions on his field, Mr............. had 800 bushels

of grain. 600 were seized for debt and seed.

Mr.............., 700 bushels, all seized.

Mr............., 1025 bushels, all seized.

Mr............. 450 bushels, one-half of it seized. This man has a family

of seven children. What can these people do? The storekeepers cannot carry them over year after year. Many people suffer in pioneer work, and any help the Church can give should be given freely. This work is not charity, but Love. Freely ye have received, freely give.

MRS. CHAS. MILLAR,

Secretary.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE Y.W. & C.G.I.T. DEPARTMENT,

The Y.W. and C.G.I.T. Department, at the end of its third year, has settled down and is gradually fitting into its proper place between the Senior Auxiliaries and the Mission Bands.

We have now 162 Auxiliaries, an increase of 25 over last year. The membership is 3,957, including 24.4 home helpers, an increase of 496. The contributions were $23,914.01, including $253.97 from the Home Helpers, an increase of $4,372.61. $2,150 were contributed through life membership and $25 through junior memberships. The average givingB were $6 per member, which is slightly lower than last year.

There are 44 affiliated C. GL I. T. groups, an increase of 24 over last year, with a membership of 815 and contributions of $308.17; also 17 associate societies, an increase of 7 with contributions of $699.67.

The total offerings of the Y.W. and C.G.I.T. Department for 1922 were $24,721.85, which is $4,502.59 over last year.

Eighteen Presbyterials have added to their groups, two have stood still, and six have gone back. Three Presbyterials have doubled their membership, while eight have gone behind. Twenty Presbyterials increased their givings; four of them made a 50 per cent, increase, one 300 per cent., one 350 per cent, and one 400 per cent. Our banner Presby-terial for 1922 is London. It has more than doubled its groups, its membership and its contributions. Our banner Auxiliary is in the Ottawa Presbyterial, with two members, an average attendance of two, and average givings of $29.

The subscriptions to the Missionary Messenger have increased from 530 to 676. Last year there were twelve Presbyterials without one Y.W. subscriber, this year eleven, a slight improvement, but one cannot but be impressed with the fact that many are trying to carry 011 without the stimulus of our splendid little magazine, or indeed any literature whatsoever, and it cannot be done.

We have fallen behind in the Home Helpers Department. In 1921 we had ten Presbyterials without one Home Helper; in 1922 we had eleven.

Both the Strangers' and Library Department should appeal to our girls and young women and yet we heard nothing of either. Perhaps something was done and not reported.

The Supply Department was not neglected. Besides $363.21 in cash, many good bales containing quilts and infant's clothing were sent to needy quarters. Christmas gifts were sent to File Hills Indian School and a box of toys to Mrs. Menzies in China.

Contributions were raised by sales of home-made cooking, bazaars, socials, entertainments, a Valentine Tea, etc., but there seems to be a new note1 in the Finance Department. We hear more of monthly envelopes, mite-boxes, a self-denial week, a cent a day for July and August,

19

a cent a day from the June meeting until the September meeting, and talent money. One Presbyterial secretary says, 'l The Y. W. Auxiliaries are getting nearer the ideal of personal givings."

The average number of meetings held during the year was ten; last year it was eleven—another backward step. Thankoffering meetings were held in every Presbyterial but two. In some Presbyterials every Auxiliary observed this annual inspirational meeting, many of them in co-operation with another group in the Home Church. The average attendance for the Y.W. Auxiliaries during the year was 60 per cent, of the membership.

The, favorite study books seem to be the biographies of "Lucy M. Baker" and "Agnes Sorrel Forbes/' and the "Girlhood of Dr. Margaret McKellar." The "Planting of the Faith" was also used and "Heroes of our Home Lands." From different Auxiliaries we hear "all willing to take part in the meeting," "no drones allowed," "not depending on outside speakers," "programme carried on more and more by the members," " many interested in the work,' younger girls have been elected to office, and we expect it will add to their interest.;;

Many spoke of the addresses they had enjoyed from Presbyterial ana Provincial officers, from members of the Executive Board, from our field secretary, Miss MacGregor, and from our missionaries on furlough, and expressed appreciation for the inspiration and information gleaned thereby. Ee. "outside speakers," one Presbyterial Secretary says, "Some seem still to feel that their meeting must have much outside help, which is very interesting, but only as crutches to the lame, as far as development of members is concerned, the enthusiasm coming from without instead of from within. The enthusiasm engendered *by personal study and knowledge of our mission problems is the only sure foundation for sustained effort year after year."

The desire for closer co-operation seems very evident, and here and there, once in a while we hear faint murmurings toward that end. A few rallies and banquets were held and were a great success. Why not many more? In two Presbyterials the Senior Auxiliaries have appointed one of their number to attend the meetings of the 'teen-age girls at least once a month. The girls assure us that the visitor has always had a cordial welcome, and that such a represeii fcative could help them very much. Other groups have asked for the same thing. One Presbyterial Secretary says, "In my Presbyterial about 800 girls and young women are enrolled in the W.M.S. out of a possible 2,000. This presents a clear and unmistakable challenge. The increase in interest in this Department in the last few years, and the /manifest enthusiasm that now prevails, points to great things ahead if we will but go in and possess the land." Another secretary says, "We, the members of the W.M.S., have it in our own hands. We don't visit the junior groups as we ought to." Another says, "The girls themselves are faithful and energetic, but much depends on the mothers." A mother and daughter banquet much impressed one secretary. One of the girls said, "Our girls' work needs a boost.

Once in a while we hear a sad note. "One C.G.I.T. must disband unless some one (a lover of ^oung life) accepts the responsibility of leadership." The same old need—but against that, one hears of and sees many bright, happy, eager young faces carrying on with a confidence and evident enjoyment in the work, that is most encouraging and that gives the key-note to our future policy—judicious guidance. We will never get anywhere on the organizing and forgetting policy.

Realizing more and more that a secretary, especially adapted to the work, and one who has no other absorbing ties is needed, your secretary is pleased to report that all Presbyterials but five, are so provided, and would urge upon the others to study local conditions and appoint one as soon as possible w"ho will devote herself to the organizing and training of pirls and young women in systematic study of church missions. She

20

would further appeal to the Senior Auxiliaries to use their lookout secretaries to co-operate with the Presbyterial secretaries in building up and strengthening this Department.

Let our aim for 1923 be "organize and follow up/' especially follow up. Otherwise the mission seeds sown will be like unto that which fell upon stony places, where they had not much earth and forthwith they sprung up because they had no deepness of earth, and when the sun was up they were scorched, and because they had no root they withered away.

"There's only one to-day; to-morrow lies

Yelled from the finite outlook of our eyes

And yesterday is done—beyond recall

Its power and wealth; we've just to-day, that's all.

We've just to-day to turn the tears to smiles, Of those the wayfarers of life's long miles, We've just to-day to ease the common load, Of fellow-trudgers on the upland road.

So let us try to fill with heartsome glory

The daily telling of our little story

Nor puzzle overmuch on why or how,

Of far to-morrows; this is God's own 'Now,'

And He will guide us down the farther way,

If we prove faithful in His work to-day.'

Eespectfully submitted,

IDA MALCOLMSON, Ont. Prov. Y.W. & G.G.I.T. Secretary.

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Annual Report of the Women's Missionary Society


This is the Eighth Annual Report of the Women's Missionary Society of the Presbyterian Church in Canada.
The original document was provided by the South Dumfries Historical Society.