County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections
A Day in the Life of South Ward School


Description
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Documents
Description:
This is an essay written by Mrs. Isabel Graham recounting a day in the life at the South Ward School in 1920.

Her essay was submitted in response to the school's request for information about its past.

The original document was provided by the Paris Museum and Historical Society.
Notes:
Property of the Paris Museum and Historical Society.
Inventory No. 64.23
Date of Original:
1921
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
2001PM056
Collection:
Paris Museum School Memories Collection
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.2 Longitude: -80.38333
Recommended Citation:
A Day in the life of South Ward School, ca. 1921. Paris Museum and Historical Society, No. 64.23.
Terms of Use:
The information and images provided are for personal research only and are not to be used for commercial purposes. Use of this information should include the credit "Paris Museum and Historical Society."
Contact
Paris Museum and Historical Society
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

Paris Museum and Historical Society

51 William Street, Paris, ON

N3L 1N4

(519) 442-9295

Full Text

Residents of Paris were requested to loan pictures and to let u., have any information pertinent to this history. The following was submitted

by MRS. ISABEL GRAHAM.

1920-1021 A DAY IN THE LIFE CF SOUTH WARD SCHOOL

It's 9 a.m. The brass hand bell was rung by Kiss Amy at the back door. The children line up in the yard in two straight lines, one girls and one boys. Miss Amy and Kiss Fisher stand by the door and when everything is quiet we file in, little ones first and then bigger ones. V/e go to the cloak room at the back of the class, remove our coat? and hats and quietly take our places along- the sides of the double desks. The teacher comes in and tells us to take our seats, then there is a Bible reading followed by the Lord's Prayer repeated in unison, and the day is begun.

Monday is Penny Bank Day. We bring up our pennies, nickels etc. to the teachers desk and our books, she marks our book, puts the money in a small cloth bag and when the bag is brought across from the "primmer" room, one of the bigger boys is sent down town to deposit it with Mr. Moss at Central and come right back. Keanwhile the rest get on with our Arithmetic. A 'water bottle1 falls to the floor -the culprit receives a look, and after a frantic mop up job with a "slate rag" is told to take a place at the front of the room and finish his or her work at the board. Then there is reading with pupils standing and taking turns reading orally. Then recess, in bad days to the basement - good days in the yard, same procedure as morning, stand, take your seats, proceed with lessons till noon. During school hours anyone who goes off the school grounds is in trouble.

Afternoon session - same as morning except for prayers etc. The seats are hard and fastened to the floor. The working part is hinged and when in use makes a desk, when you are through lessons it is folder tack on itself. If the class sets too restless, the teachers set the class to stand by their sets and do exercises,

bends and stretches etc. There is no electricity so if it gets dark Teachers reads a story or holds a spelling match - Discipline is strict - the teacher is boss and the parents are on the side of the teacher, "If you get a licking1 at school, you'll get one when you get home". There is one strap in the school - in times of trouble the culprit is sent across the hall to "get the strap" from the other teacher - she takes it, flexes it, lays it on her desk and sends the culprit to his or her seat and with the strap in view on her desk, order reigns.

On Friday afternoon we have Art, with crayons, Nature Study, and the Music Teacher from Central School comes to teach us songs, which comes in handy - if it sets dark we can sin? as well as having stories and spelling: On Fridays, if we've been good all week, we get out at 3-30 p.m. instead of 4 p.m.

If school got cold we wore our coats.

This is as I remember South Ward School.

Mrs. Gillam (not sure of spelling) cleaned school at night and carried a lantern for light.

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A Day in the Life of South Ward School


This is an essay written by Mrs. Isabel Graham recounting a day in the life at the South Ward School in 1920.

Her essay was submitted in response to the school's request for information about its past.

The original document was provided by the Paris Museum and Historical Society.