Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
Painting the Shillum Barn, 1952-1954


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Information for this record is taken from the book Wayne Shillum has written, book citation in the Notes below here.

Rose and Robert Shillum bought the 100 acre dairy farm on the Back Concession (now 3133 Burnhamthorpe Rd. West), Palermo, from Fred Edwards and moved their family from Toronto in 1950. The farm was called Rosemar.

Robert was a sales representative for a paint company called Berry Brothers. His territory was Ontario. Painting the barn was a carefully planned, professional process. It started in 1952 but Robert did not like the colour and stopped the work. In spring 1954, he started again and the job finished in the fall.

Robert is the figure on the barn roof. He did all the work.

Wayne remembers the work in detail. Safety was first and in these photographs you can see ropes over the peak of the barn. These were attached to a tractor on the far side and had loops for hanging on and a safety harness. A ladder that reached past the eaves was tied to the barn. The old paint was scoured off in strips of 15 to 20 feet. The area was then primed with red oxide. This was an all-day job.

Painting used a very large compressor and spray guns held in the farm's old Department of Highways truck. Mom, Wayne and Brian were always holding the ladder even though it was tied to the barn, and they were also responsible for adjusting the spray gun rope. Wayne writes, "After what seemed like an eternity to all of us (the helpless spectators), both sides of the roof were completed."

Next was painting the four barn sides with a height of 60 feet at each end! It was painted white which required a second coat to hide the previous green colour that was not liked, and two years later, Robert painted the entire barn white again to ensure a full hiding coat. Wayne says that today, 60+ years later, the paint job is still in reasonable shape.
Notes:
Shillum, Wayne E. The Farmboy in 1950's Palermo Ontario. Publisher: WES Marketing, cJanuary 2018. ISBN 1987978064, 9781987978063 (Available from Amazon.ca)
Date of Publication:
1954
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
Robert Henry Shillum, called Bob, April 19, 1915-March 1999 ; Rose Violet Shillum, called Rose, March 14, 1914-April 1998 ; Sons: Robert Lloyd Shillum, called Bob, August 29, 1938-October 3, 1993 ; Wayne Edward Shillum, b. March 12, 1944 ; Brian David Shillum, b.October 6, 1947.
Local identifier:
TTWES000727
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4488653713067 Longitude: -79.797349555664
Recommended Citation:
Painting the Shillum Barn
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Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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Painting the Shillum Barn, 1952-1954


Information for this record is taken from the book Wayne Shillum has written, book citation in the Notes below here.

Rose and Robert Shillum bought the 100 acre dairy farm on the Back Concession (now 3133 Burnhamthorpe Rd. West), Palermo, from Fred Edwards and moved their family from Toronto in 1950. The farm was called Rosemar.

Robert was a sales representative for a paint company called Berry Brothers. His territory was Ontario. Painting the barn was a carefully planned, professional process. It started in 1952 but Robert did not like the colour and stopped the work. In spring 1954, he started again and the job finished in the fall.

Robert is the figure on the barn roof. He did all the work.

Wayne remembers the work in detail. Safety was first and in these photographs you can see ropes over the peak of the barn. These were attached to a tractor on the far side and had loops for hanging on and a safety harness. A ladder that reached past the eaves was tied to the barn. The old paint was scoured off in strips of 15 to 20 feet. The area was then primed with red oxide. This was an all-day job.

Painting used a very large compressor and spray guns held in the farm's old Department of Highways truck. Mom, Wayne and Brian were always holding the ladder even though it was tied to the barn, and they were also responsible for adjusting the spray gun rope. Wayne writes, "After what seemed like an eternity to all of us (the helpless spectators), both sides of the roof were completed."

Next was painting the four barn sides with a height of 60 feet at each end! It was painted white which required a second coat to hide the previous green colour that was not liked, and two years later, Robert painted the entire barn white again to ensure a full hiding coat. Wayne says that today, 60+ years later, the paint job is still in reasonable shape.