Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
The Old Middle Road Bridge Over Bronte Creek, ca1939-1940


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Here is another view of the old iron bridge crossing Bronte Creek (aka Twelve Mile Creek) just south of the Queen Elizabeth Way in the southwest corner of Oakville, Ontario.

This photo and the typed notes were created by George Atkins whose property, Woodlands, was just north of the new QEW at Bronte Road along the eastern Creek bluffs.

The road grades approaching the old bridge were steep, treacherous in bad weather. The upper trestles are clearly visible in this photograph compared to the other photograph of the same bridge at about the same time in our collection.

The QEW was an Ontario Department of Highways construction project during the Depression. The Highway was dedicated in 1939. A link to the excellent Wikipedia page on "The Middle Road" between Toronto and Hamilton in Ontario, in particular the Bronte Creek crossing showing another good photograph of this bridge in about 1936 is provided for your further information.

The Wikipedia article clarifies the inscription written by Mr. Atkins on the top of the photograph, when he says, "looking south from the new Merton bridge (Middle Rd.)" The Wikipedia editor explains that between 1931 and 1939 the road was called "The Middle Road" and various other local names. The entire length was designated as the Queen Elizabeth Way in August 1940 at its official opening. As a long time resident of the area which was known as Merton, Mr. Atkins used local names for the bridge.

Notes:
This photograph taken by George Stuart Atkins have been shared with the Trafalgar Township Historical Society by the Bronte Historical Society. The Bronte Historical Society has a wealth of information on the Bronte area of Halton County, Ontario. A link to their website is provided for your further information.
Inscriptions:
The old iron bridge, looking south from the new Merton bridge (Middle Rd.) & beneath it, the swimming hole. Circa 1939-1940 upon completion of the new QEW bridge. Lot 30 Con. 111 SDS (looking south from the road allowance, i.e. the line between Con. 11 & Con. 111.) Source, George Atkins.
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
George Stuart Atkins
Local identifier:
TTGSA000614
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 43.4058740480286
    Latitude: 43.4058740480286 Longitude: -79.7415516296387
Recommended Citation:
The Old Middle Road Bridge Over Bronte Creek, ca1939-1940
Contact
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Email
WWW address

Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
The Old Middle Road Bridge Over Bronte Creek, ca1939-1940
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The Old Middle Road Bridge Over Bronte Creek, ca1939-1940


Here is another view of the old iron bridge crossing Bronte Creek (aka Twelve Mile Creek) just south of the Queen Elizabeth Way in the southwest corner of Oakville, Ontario.

This photo and the typed notes were created by George Atkins whose property, Woodlands, was just north of the new QEW at Bronte Road along the eastern Creek bluffs.

The road grades approaching the old bridge were steep, treacherous in bad weather. The upper trestles are clearly visible in this photograph compared to the other photograph of the same bridge at about the same time in our collection.

The QEW was an Ontario Department of Highways construction project during the Depression. The Highway was dedicated in 1939. A link to the excellent Wikipedia page on "The Middle Road" between Toronto and Hamilton in Ontario, in particular the Bronte Creek crossing showing another good photograph of this bridge in about 1936 is provided for your further information.

The Wikipedia article clarifies the inscription written by Mr. Atkins on the top of the photograph, when he says, "looking south from the new Merton bridge (Middle Rd.)" The Wikipedia editor explains that between 1931 and 1939 the road was called "The Middle Road" and various other local names. The entire length was designated as the Queen Elizabeth Way in August 1940 at its official opening. As a long time resident of the area which was known as Merton, Mr. Atkins used local names for the bridge.