Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
Full Text of "Century Old Home- Elmbank Farm, Tovell Brothers" with Photographs, by Margaret Joubert, MAC, 1969
:


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Types:
Documents
Photographs
Description:
To read the essay by Margaret Joubert, click on "pages" at the top left side of the page to open up the 5 pages.

For your further information: In 1918, Mr. William Tovell Senior bought the farm from Dr. Anson Buck’s estate. In 1940 the Tovell Brothers business purchased this farm from their father.

The Tovell house was a nine room farm house located on Lot 27, Concession 1, South of Dundas Street.

According to the first history of the farm property, it was purchased by John Lepard in 1807 from the Crown. A year later, in 1808, the property was sold to Dr. Anson Buck, a physician and prominent gentleman in municipal affairs. It was Dr. Anson Buck that built the first and existing home on this property in about 1868.

(The first official finding of assessment was dated in 1868 and is on record in the Oakville Municipal Offices.)

Although Dr. Buck built the house, he did not live here. Since this farm home is situated on the Dundas Highway, it was used in earlier years as a stage coach stop for the military road between Toronto and Hamilton.

In 2005, the land was purchased by a developer and the house was at risk. Thanks to the efforts of the developer and the Oakville Historical Society, the house was disassembled, moved to the Joshua Creek area of Oakville and reassembled where new home owners enjoy it.
Notes:
The house was Designated and linked to this record is the newspaper story by David Lea of the Oakville Beaver which describes the decision of the developer to relocate the house and how they managed to complete this project.
Inscriptions:
Written by hand beside the top photograph: The old Buck Homestead, Dundas St. The little old part is the origin[al] home of 1805. The last of the pioneer apple trees in the great orchard.

Hand written underneath the bottom photograph: the Present Tovell Farm.
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
TTOIMPT0002
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.43341 Longitude: -79.78293
Recommended Citation:
Full Text of "Century Old Home - Elmbank Farm, Tovell Brothers" with Photographs, by Margaret Joubert, MAC, 1969
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Trafalgar Township Historical Society
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Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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Full Text of "Century Old Home- Elmbank Farm, Tovell Brothers" with Photographs, by Margaret Joubert, MAC, 1969


To read the essay by Margaret Joubert, click on "pages" at the top left side of the page to open up the 5 pages.

For your further information: In 1918, Mr. William Tovell Senior bought the farm from Dr. Anson Buck’s estate. In 1940 the Tovell Brothers business purchased this farm from their father.

The Tovell house was a nine room farm house located on Lot 27, Concession 1, South of Dundas Street.

According to the first history of the farm property, it was purchased by John Lepard in 1807 from the Crown. A year later, in 1808, the property was sold to Dr. Anson Buck, a physician and prominent gentleman in municipal affairs. It was Dr. Anson Buck that built the first and existing home on this property in about 1868.

(The first official finding of assessment was dated in 1868 and is on record in the Oakville Municipal Offices.)

Although Dr. Buck built the house, he did not live here. Since this farm home is situated on the Dundas Highway, it was used in earlier years as a stage coach stop for the military road between Toronto and Hamilton.

In 2005, the land was purchased by a developer and the house was at risk. Thanks to the efforts of the developer and the Oakville Historical Society, the house was disassembled, moved to the Joshua Creek area of Oakville and reassembled where new home owners enjoy it.