Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
Palermo Community Hall Building Plaque 1921-1974


Description
Media Type:
Image
Text
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
The community of Palermo started as early as 1806. By 1835, the town had developed enough to boast its own post office, churches, schools, stores, blacksmith and surrounding mixed farming. The active community started the Palermo Sons of Temperance in 1850 and this group was the genus of the community hall.

The last "Palermo Public Hall Corporation" building (as the hall was legally called) was built in 1912 on Lot 31, 1st Con SDS. The building was totally funded by the people of Palermo and the events held in it - no government money aided the Hall. The Hall saw many social, sporting, political, religious events over the next 61 years.

In 1973, the building was demolished to widen Bronte Road. To commemorate the old Hall which had been the hub of Palermo for so many years, there was thought of building a gazebo and it is thought this plaque was perhaps created to be placed in the gazebo.

When the cornerstone of the demolished building was lifted, it held a surprise. On the back of the stone, it was carved with the death date and misspelled name of Mary Inglehart. The Tweedsmuir History scrapbook has a newspaper clipping about this, as people thought that the stonemason's error ("Ingelhart") meant he had to redo the gravestone for the family, so his shop later used the stone for a purpose where the error was not likely to be seen.

Also in the Hall, a similar plaque honoured Mr. Henry Heeks and another was a Trafalgar War Memorial Plaque. A commemorative "WWII Honor Roll of Palermo Volunteers" also hung in the Hall. As well, the flag pole of the Hall, which was erected in memory of Dr. Anson Buck, stood at the front of the building. All of these items are now displayed in the collection of the Trafalgar Township Historical Society at the old, one-room schoolhouse in Palermo and photographic records of them can be found by searching further in this online collection.
Notes:
Information here has been taken from the Nelson Women's Institute Tweedsmuir History in which Palermo is covered in Book III, pages 41-87, which was prepared sometime about 1960. Also from the writing and documents in the collection of the Trafalgar Township Historical Society. A photograph of the Hall built in 1912 and demolished in 1973 is also linked here for your further information.
Inscriptions:
This building erected from the proceeds of Palermo Community Hall 1912 - 1974
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
TTMNK000459
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.43341 Longitude: -79.78293
Recommended Citation:
Palermo Community Hall Building Plaque 1921-1974
Contact
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Email
WWW address

Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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Palermo Community Hall Building Plaque 1921-1974


The community of Palermo started as early as 1806. By 1835, the town had developed enough to boast its own post office, churches, schools, stores, blacksmith and surrounding mixed farming. The active community started the Palermo Sons of Temperance in 1850 and this group was the genus of the community hall.

The last "Palermo Public Hall Corporation" building (as the hall was legally called) was built in 1912 on Lot 31, 1st Con SDS. The building was totally funded by the people of Palermo and the events held in it - no government money aided the Hall. The Hall saw many social, sporting, political, religious events over the next 61 years.

In 1973, the building was demolished to widen Bronte Road. To commemorate the old Hall which had been the hub of Palermo for so many years, there was thought of building a gazebo and it is thought this plaque was perhaps created to be placed in the gazebo.

When the cornerstone of the demolished building was lifted, it held a surprise. On the back of the stone, it was carved with the death date and misspelled name of Mary Inglehart. The Tweedsmuir History scrapbook has a newspaper clipping about this, as people thought that the stonemason's error ("Ingelhart") meant he had to redo the gravestone for the family, so his shop later used the stone for a purpose where the error was not likely to be seen.

Also in the Hall, a similar plaque honoured Mr. Henry Heeks and another was a Trafalgar War Memorial Plaque. A commemorative "WWII Honor Roll of Palermo Volunteers" also hung in the Hall. As well, the flag pole of the Hall, which was erected in memory of Dr. Anson Buck, stood at the front of the building. All of these items are now displayed in the collection of the Trafalgar Township Historical Society at the old, one-room schoolhouse in Palermo and photographic records of them can be found by searching further in this online collection.