Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
John Thomas (Jack) Moulding Jumping, The Great War


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
Mr. David Fearnley, a historian in Lancashire, England, writes:
John Thomas Moulding joined the Lancashire Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry on 1/2/1897 and was in the regiment for 6 years. He was born in Wigan, in 1879, a son of Thomas Kinder Moulding and his wife Anne (or Ann). In the 1881 Census, the family lived at Harrogate Street, Wigan; 1891 at Old Elms Farm, Swinley, Wigan and in 1901 at 2 Tithebarn Road, Ashton in Makerfield.

Jack was employed as a groom in the stables at the Gerard family residence of Garswood Hall, Ashton in Makerfield. In 1899 when the Boer War began in South Africa the colonel of the Lancashire Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry was Sir William Cansfield Gerard of Garswood Hall. As a yeomanry regiment, the Lancashire Hussars were not allowed to fight overseas. Only in 1900, when the British realised they needed cavalry troops quickly, were the yeomanry regiments allowed to fight in South Africa where they formed the Imperial Yeomanry.

In 1899 at the start of the Boer War, Sir William Cansfield Gerard was appointed aide de camp to General Sir Redvers Buller, commander of the British forces in Natal, South Africa. Sir William took with him two members of the Ashton in Makerfield Lancashire Hussars - Fred Farmer, a butler at Garswood Hall, and John Moulding, a groom at the stables (both to act as his servants or batmen as they would be called in World War One). John Moulding was present at the battles of Belfast, Colenso, Laing's Nek and the relief of Ladysmith.

In 1902 Sir William died and was buried at Ashton in Makerfield. In the military funeral procession, Fred Farmer and John Moulding dressed totally in black in the military uniform they had worn in South Africa, walked on either side of Sir William's charger (horse) behind the gun carriage that carried the coffin.

In 1910 John Moulding sailed from Liverpool to Quebec. He joined the 9th Mississauga Horse and then the 4th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles during World War One where he became a officer servant/batman (a similar job to that of the Boer War) for Captain Marlatt."

Jack's lifelong work was with horses as an equestian, trainer, stable manager. He had a innate love and ability for these animals. Because of his service in the Boer War, he was trained as a British cavalry horseman.
Subject(s):
Personal Name(s):
John Thomas Moulding, called Jack, born 1879, married Jennie Ligouri McDermott, a stenographer and singer, in Oakville, Ontario in 1923, died November 1947.
Local identifier:
TTJMG000332
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
John Thomas (Jack) Moulding Jumping, The Great War
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John Thomas (Jack) Moulding Jumping, The Great War
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Moulding Family, Oakville
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4th Canadian Mounted Rifles
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John Thomas (Jack) Moulding Jumping, The Great War


Mr. David Fearnley, a historian in Lancashire, England, writes:
John Thomas Moulding joined the Lancashire Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry on 1/2/1897 and was in the regiment for 6 years. He was born in Wigan, in 1879, a son of Thomas Kinder Moulding and his wife Anne (or Ann). In the 1881 Census, the family lived at Harrogate Street, Wigan; 1891 at Old Elms Farm, Swinley, Wigan and in 1901 at 2 Tithebarn Road, Ashton in Makerfield.

Jack was employed as a groom in the stables at the Gerard family residence of Garswood Hall, Ashton in Makerfield. In 1899 when the Boer War began in South Africa the colonel of the Lancashire Hussars Yeomanry Cavalry was Sir William Cansfield Gerard of Garswood Hall. As a yeomanry regiment, the Lancashire Hussars were not allowed to fight overseas. Only in 1900, when the British realised they needed cavalry troops quickly, were the yeomanry regiments allowed to fight in South Africa where they formed the Imperial Yeomanry.

In 1899 at the start of the Boer War, Sir William Cansfield Gerard was appointed aide de camp to General Sir Redvers Buller, commander of the British forces in Natal, South Africa. Sir William took with him two members of the Ashton in Makerfield Lancashire Hussars - Fred Farmer, a butler at Garswood Hall, and John Moulding, a groom at the stables (both to act as his servants or batmen as they would be called in World War One). John Moulding was present at the battles of Belfast, Colenso, Laing's Nek and the relief of Ladysmith.

In 1902 Sir William died and was buried at Ashton in Makerfield. In the military funeral procession, Fred Farmer and John Moulding dressed totally in black in the military uniform they had worn in South Africa, walked on either side of Sir William's charger (horse) behind the gun carriage that carried the coffin.

In 1910 John Moulding sailed from Liverpool to Quebec. He joined the 9th Mississauga Horse and then the 4th Regiment Canadian Mounted Rifles during World War One where he became a officer servant/batman (a similar job to that of the Boer War) for Captain Marlatt."

Jack's lifelong work was with horses as an equestian, trainer, stable manager. He had a innate love and ability for these animals. Because of his service in the Boer War, he was trained as a British cavalry horseman.