Trafalgar Township Historical Society Digital Collections
Dundas Street Bridge Construction Over Sixteen Mile Creek, 1922


Description
Media Type:
Image
Item Type:
Photographs
Description:
The following observations have been suggested by these photographs: It appears that they were rolling the bridge trusses out from the west bank, onto the concrete piers, and that they were building the piers one at a time, possibly filling the formwork with concrete from the top. This would make sense, because cart loads of concrete could be brought from the west bank, where it was being mixed, over to the top of the pier under construction, and then poured down, (not lifted up as we do today). Why? Cranes were simply not available as they are today, so it was much easier to move heavy loads of material from above and let gravity do the rest. Also, these trusses in the photos appear to be of an older type, the so-called lattice truss type. [Could these be] the older trusses from the Anson Buck iron bridge? If so, it would suggest that the lower parts of the piers were actually stone, and that the bridge was not rebuilt, but added to. The photos are suggesting that the difficulty of going halfway down a steep hill to get to the bridge and then back up the other side, was the reason why the bridge was raised to the top of the valley, and, that the frugal bridge builders simply took the old iron trusses off the foundations, added concrete piers on top of the original stone piers until they reached the elevation of the top of the valley, and then replaced the iron trusses on top of these piers.

You will notice in the lower picture that the bridge does not (yet) continue to the right of the tall trees, and that there appears to be board formwork where the next pier should be. Also the trusses on top of the bridge trusses are offset from the piers, indicating that they are being moved out onto the bridge from the left bank.
Notes:
Note the horse and buggy going up the hill in the top picture, and it's hard to see, but possibly two people with a car to the right.

These steep valley hillside roads were sometimes referred to by local people as "hogback" roads.
Date of Publication:
1922
Dimensions:
Width: 1519 px
Height: 2096 px
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
TTAB00016
Collection:
Trafalgar Township Historical Society
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Dundas Street Bridge Construction Over Sixteen Mile Creek, 1922
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Trafalgar Township Historical Society
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Trafalgar Township Historical Society Sponsor: Jeff Knoll, Local & Regional Councillor for Oakville Ward 5 – Town of Oakville/Regional Municipality of Halton
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Dundas Street Bridge Construction Over Sixteen Mile Creek, 1922


The following observations have been suggested by these photographs: It appears that they were rolling the bridge trusses out from the west bank, onto the concrete piers, and that they were building the piers one at a time, possibly filling the formwork with concrete from the top. This would make sense, because cart loads of concrete could be brought from the west bank, where it was being mixed, over to the top of the pier under construction, and then poured down, (not lifted up as we do today). Why? Cranes were simply not available as they are today, so it was much easier to move heavy loads of material from above and let gravity do the rest. Also, these trusses in the photos appear to be of an older type, the so-called lattice truss type. [Could these be] the older trusses from the Anson Buck iron bridge? If so, it would suggest that the lower parts of the piers were actually stone, and that the bridge was not rebuilt, but added to. The photos are suggesting that the difficulty of going halfway down a steep hill to get to the bridge and then back up the other side, was the reason why the bridge was raised to the top of the valley, and, that the frugal bridge builders simply took the old iron trusses off the foundations, added concrete piers on top of the original stone piers until they reached the elevation of the top of the valley, and then replaced the iron trusses on top of these piers.

You will notice in the lower picture that the bridge does not (yet) continue to the right of the tall trees, and that there appears to be board formwork where the next pier should be. Also the trusses on top of the bridge trusses are offset from the piers, indicating that they are being moved out onto the bridge from the left bank.