Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, May 10, 1936


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on May 10, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, gardening, his financial difficulties, and his diet.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Anastasia Smith in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
May 10, 1936
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.38.10
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 43.4668
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

May 10, 1936.

Dear Mother:

I really do not have much to write to-day, but will go through the motion anyway. It is a nice fine day to-day – not quite so hot as yesterday and the day before when the thermometer almost touched the nineties. It is remarkable how rapidly the leaves put forth. You could almost see them growing: and while early in the week there wasn’t a leaf visible on any bush or tree, it would now be hard to fine one without some leaves on it. On Thursday Arthur and I started to work in the garden, and we got about everything planted except cabbage and to-matoes; and even for the former I planted the seeds. It looks now as though the summer, so long delayed, has come to stay. Well, “dead week” is now over, and this week we start our final examinations, which will require a great deal of “sitting” and of reading and examining and grading of papers – a [?] of climax to the year’s work. But in a couple of weeks all will be over, and we will be looking forward to the coming of Synod again with all the work that this involves in the writing and

(Page 2)

publication of the minutes. Even last week I was not altogether idle, as I had the synodical “Bulletin” to prepare and considerable proof reading to do, and am not done with it yet as the material is not all in. Money matters with me are now a little – just a wee little better. Last week I received a cheque for the prize in Homiletics, a prize of $5, from Rev. Grothe. He made the cheque out for $5.35 in order to cover stamp and exchange and said that, if anything was left over, I should buy me a cigar. Well, there was 16₵ left over. I didn’t invest in a cigar, but paid off the paper boy for delivering The Globe and had five cents left over, which I gave to Eileen this morning for Sunday School collection. I went down to Church this morning, as per usual, without a cent in my pocket; but had hardly taken my seat when the church treasurer came around and handed me a cheque for $5.00 for my assistance in the Easter service. I had not expected anything for this and was quite surprised. As I was in arrears $5.00 or so in my Church account, I simply endorsed the cheque and put it on the collection plate to cover my indebtedness. So I think that that debt is now about wiped out. To make sure that I would get this letter off to you to-day, I stamped an envelope and printed your address on it early last week, taking time by the forelock, as it were. But I guess I would have got it off

(Page 3)

anyway as my colleague, the German secretary sent me a half-dozen stamps or so out of his synodical account. So you see “The Lord helps those who can’t help themselves,” or words to that effect. But the governing authorities are supremely indifferent to our deplorable situation; and there is no sign of any salary payment in sight. The Board will hold a meeting this week, but will probably be wholly occupied with the fight between the President and the Dean, which will probably result in the expulsion of one or the other from the institution, as the president is determined to accept no compromise. Secretary Wickey, I understand, is to be on hand to expedite matters. It is not difficult to prophesy which way he will turn as he has heard only one side of the quarrel, but has no doubt heard an “ear full”. The whole thing is unfortunate for the good of the institution. Fortunately none of the professors in the College or in the Seminary is involved with the exception of one College professor who has taken a definite stand. But it will be interesting to see just how the affair will turn out. The whole dispute could and should have been avoided. As the situation stands, everything is in a turmoil and the institution is apt to bear the brunt. Bonnie

(Page 4)

spent all of last week in “house-cleaning” – the semi-annual institution, which nearly breaks the backs of the women and the hearts of the men. She will be at it all this week yet – “more’s the pity”, as old Shakespeare used to say. It may be interesting to Pearl to know that I have gone on a “diet”. I was getting too fat and Dr. Zwick advised me to eliminate potatoes, butter and everything fried. I have been on it now for two weeks or more. The first week I lost five pounds. Since then I have been holding my own and maintaining my normal weight of 172 lbs. I think I am now more supple than I was and can take a stretch in bed without fear of cramps in my legs, which used to be the invariable result of a vigorous stretch. But I am still somewhat low in spirits on account of the financial depression. Before I get off on that line again, I will close. With love and all good wishes, I am

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, May 10, 1936
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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, May 10, 1936


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on May 10, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, gardening, his financial difficulties, and his diet.