Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, April 26, 1936


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on April 26, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses swimming in Silver Lake, the weather, and the disaster at Moose River Gold Mine.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Raquel Romeo in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
April 26, 1936
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.38.8
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

April 26, 1936

Dear Mother:

Another week has flown by on the swift-moving whirligig wings of time, and I must write you again, whether I have anything much to say or not. Our summer is long and slow in coming. It’s slowness in coming reminds me of the words of a man that I heard the other day, who said, “Here in Canada we have 7 months of winter, 3 months cold weather, and 2 months summer.” We have had to keep our furnace going constantly all through April and it is still going strong. Only last Wednesday I had to order another ton of coal – making the 12th ton for the winter. That makes quite a hole in one’s empty pocket, or rather piles up debts when no money is coming in. Normally I don’t worry much about money matters; but this thing has been going along so long that it is gradually “getting under my skin”, and acts as a damper upon my naturally optimistic spirit, especially at this time of year when so many things crop up calling for expenditure. Only yesterday I spoke to the president about it. He merely shrugged his shoulders and said that no money was at hand and that he didn’t know

(Page 2)

when any would be coming in. His intimation was that it might be quite a while off yet. Bonnie takes matters of this kind more seriously than I do, and she is away “down in the dumps”. If it were not for this situation she would “up in the air” or in high spirits, literally speaking; because today is the fifth anniversary of her operation; and naturally she feels that she will have no return of her serious trouble, which threatened so sorely to take her life. After five years have passed, she can feel safe and secure along that line; for which we can never be too thankful. Today is also Ruth’s birthday. That young lady is now 15 years old. I can appreciate her age; for it took 75₵ out of my meager pocket, which I could ill afford to spare and which I couldn’t have paid at all if I had not received five dollars for preaching on Easter Sunday, of which by the practice of strict economics I saved a little. But I am not going to say any more about financial strains. There is no sense and nothing to be gained by piling one’s burdens upon others’ shoulders. I wouldn’t have written this much had it not been for the Biblical rule, “Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaketh.” So here’s an end of that matter: only forget it. We have all been very much wrought up over the imprisonment and rescue of the men entrapped in the old gold mine at Moore River, N.S. Our papers were full of it for the whole ten days, and no doubt your papers also had a good deal to say about it. We had our two radios on almost

(Page 3)

incessantly day and night while the work of rescue was going on. Bonnie and the women folks generally took it much to heart; and there was much weeping and shedding of tears. Happily that is all over now and the two living men are enjoying the glorious sunlight of day once again and are rapidly recuperating from the effect of their horrible experience, and Canadian women are picking up courage and regaining their nerves again. I wrote a short article on the matter for one of the Toronto papers the other day, but it hasn’t appeared as yet. I expect it to appear about Monday. I have been taking my daily swims down at the lake with regularity lately. I can’t endure the bath tub when I can get into water in the open. In spite of the coolness of the weather, I have been in at least 20 times since the first of April. On the 22nd it was so cold that my swimming suit froze stiff on the way back from the lake and I could have used it as a walking stick and on St. George’s day, the 23rd, I had to break through the ice, which extended all the way across the lake in order to get in. Fortunately the ice was thin and was not difficult to break. I think I have said enough, and will stop. With love and all good wishes, I am

As ever, Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, April 26, 1936


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on April 26, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses swimming in Silver Lake, the weather, and the disaster at Moose River Gold Mine.