Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, February 16, 1936


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on February 16, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, the children's standing at school, the construction of Carolus' new house, plans for Herman's birthday, and a Seminary bowling party.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Denise Lum in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Feb. 16, 1936
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.38.2
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Feb’y 16, 1936

Dear Mother:

Eileen got ahead of me, writing her letter last night and giving you all or at least the principal news, which doesn’t leave me much to say. But that doesn’t phase me, as I am sort of like Shakespeare and can “make much ado about nothing”. We were all, or to be more exact, the majority of us up to see Carolus’ new house a little while ago. The finishing process inside is coming along fine; and the house is going to be “a thing of beauty and a joy forever.” They are having a playroom in it in the basement. From the progress that is being made, I judge, it will be ready for occupation by the 29th, which is their moving day. The only unfortunate thing about this is that Carolus will be away and only Marge will be here to move in. But that may be a lucky break for him, as he will not have to help in moving, and when he comes back he will be already moved in. If he is a chip off the old block and doesn’t like moving any better than I do, he will count himself lucky. Aside from this point of view, Carolus was fortunate in getting the Montreal-Quebec hand-out. Two men from the office were considered for this

(Page 2)

job – Carolus and the boss in his room – and Carolus won out. If he makes good, as he no doubt will, he may be in line for many similar expeditions in the future. Carolus had no wind of it and didn’t know the matter was brewing till it came to him suddenly like a bolt from the blue. To-day is cold again and it is steadily snowing, just as though we didn’t have enough snow! It is piled up outside like little mountains and has pretty nearly paralyzed all the bus and automobile traffic throughout the province. It has one advantage, however, and that is, if affords the children a lot of fun. Florence and Frederick, e.g., are very happy over the winter. Speaking of Florence reminds me of a valentine episode. The children got lots of them in school and Florence got one that she particularly prized. It was from Billy McKersie and read something like this, “I love you – no fooling.” Florence who likes Billy very well, said, “I only hope he does.” Frederick also has a girl, whose name is Betty Skelton. He received a valentine from her, which he likewise prizes. The other day he wanted me to show him in the Bible where it says Methuselah was 969 years old, and when I read Gen. 5:27 to him, he said, “That’s a funny way to put it.” Nothing escapes his sharp notice. He is a good speller and tells me he has made only three mistakes in spelling since the school began this year – which I think is a very good record. Ruth is the only one of the children that is making a bad record. She stands last in her class of 56 and her average is not more than 25 or 30. She is a genius when it comes

(Page 3)

to drawing and painting; and it’s a pity we can’t give her special courses along that line, but she is no good in the ordinary high school studies. She is excellent in doing housework and cooking – probably the best in the family. But she will surely have to take this year over in High School. I am plodding her on as well as I can, but she doesn’t take much interest in her school work. In this respect she is different from all the others. This coming week promises to be an eventful one for us. Herman’s birthday comes on the 17th and his colleagues in the Warehouse are going to throw him a beer party in our house that night, in which we are all cordially invited to celebrate. Then on Friday night the Seminarians are treating themselves and their professors to a bowling party in Kitchener. After this is over they are coming here to our place for the eats and smokes and whatever other good things they can get. They are expecting a good time. May they not be disappointed! Prof. Henkel, who has a hard time to get around this winter, remarked to me the other day “I think the snow is an awful thing.” I said to him, “I do too when I have to shovel it.” And I have had a lot of it to do this winter to help him to a passage to the seminary. It looks as though I will have to be at it again to-morrow morning bright and early. But I must close. With all good wishes and love, I am

Most Sincerely yours, [signed] Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, February 16, 1936


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on February 16, 1936. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, the children's standing at school, the construction of Carolus' new house, plans for Herman's birthday, and a Seminary bowling party.