Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, December 1, 1935


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on December 1, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses his financial problems, and that it has been 2 months since he received a paycheque.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Landon Cowieson in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Dec. 1, 1935
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.37.14
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Dec. 1, 1935.

Dear Mother:

Just a few lines to-day, as news is as scarce as the proverbial frog’s hair, which, as you know is the scarcest thing in the world. But if I can’t give you a real letter, I will do the next best and give you an apology for one. I was down at Church this morning, and for the second Sunday in succession, I suffered the collection plate to pass by without putting in the contribution which I did not have. I always take it the “it is accepted according to that a man hath, and not according to that he hath not.” This, according to Paul, is good orthodox doctrine. To make sure that I would get a letter off to you to-day, I addressed an envelope to you the first of last week and put on it the last stamp that I had and stuck the stamped envelope away for use to-day. Perhaps I was a little over-cautious, as Bonnie got a few stamps during the week and would probably have given me one in the emergency; but I thought it would be well to play safe. They are now two months behind on my salary, and I have no idea when any money is coming, so I am just “gritting my teeth and bearing it”, knowing that it is “the making of the pup”.

(Page 2)

It used to be that professors’ salaries were paid before anything else; but under the Clausen regime, all other debts are paid first, and if anything happens to be left over, the professors get a little on their salary. The result is that we have to live all of the time on credit, which is stretched sometimes almost to the breaking point. But it seems that there is nothing that can be done about it. To-day opened up nice and bright, but by the time I returned home from Church it was snowing. It is still hard at it and is very dark and gloomy into the bargain. Winter seems to be setting in with the first winter month, and the lake is frozen over solidly barring all swimming. So I am hibernating in the bath-tub these mornings. Carolus and Marge are up every day to see how their house is coming on. The foundation is finished and set and window and door frames are assembled, and work on the wooden frame will proceed this week. So they think satisfactory progress is being made and are hopeful that it will be finished on scheduled (Pronounce ‘sheduled’, not ‘skeduled’) time. It seems that this couple is going to have a temporary separation from one another during the holidays. Maybe it will “make the heart grow fonder”, and maybe not. Bonnie said that I should tell Pearl that in spite of her ocular affliction, she is gaining in avoirdupois or something. She thought she was being pulled down and getting awfully thin. But when she was down town the other day

(Page 3)

and weighed she tipped the beam at 132 lbs. However, she counts it only 131 lbs., accounting for the extra pound by her overshoes, which she had on. But, even so, she might have “gone further and done worse”, as the quaint old saying reads. I wrote “M.L.” and Florence a congratulatory letter and sent them the same silver five cent piece that I sent to Clarence and Lena on the occasion of their Silver Anniversary some years ago. I hope they will take the hint and return it, so that I can use it for the next anniversary. If they don’t, I don’t know what I will do, as “Poor folks has such poor ways”, you know. Frederick is enclosing a little letter to you. He thinks he just must write to his grandmother and inquire about her health. He writes his letters all alone without any help. Just now he is keeping his finger nails clean every day and hopes to get the prize for being the cleanest child in his room, as well as standing first educationally. We had Dr. and Mrs. Maurer with us on Tuesday of last week. He is looking well for an old fellow and seems to be enjoying his period of retirement. They live at Woodstock, some 80 miles west of here. Marion and Howard gave me a pound of tobacco the other day, so I am not suffering a smoke famine. Well, I must close. With love and all good wishes, I am

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, December 1, 1935


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on December 1, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses his financial problems, and that it has been 2 months since he received a paycheque.