Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, November 24, 1935


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on November 24, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, swimming in Silver Lake, Bonnie's eyesight, the new house that Carolus and Marguerite and building and Mrs. Froats' accident.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Alexa Kelly in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Nov. 24, 1935
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.37.13
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Nov. 24, 1935.

Dear Mother:

Pearl’s letter was received last week and was read with joy and gladness. While this is written to you it is also intended as an answer to her letter, and I trust she will accept it as such. We were particularly glad to hear that you had a canary again. Both Bonnie and I held and had expressed the opinion that Herbert would get you a new bird and that he was only awaiting the opportunity to procure and deliver it. Pearl’s letter only confirmed our preconceived opinion. Another thing, we both are of the opinion, i.e. if you have not already named the bird, that he should be called “Victor Herbert”. Our raison for this is not so much that Herbert supplied the bird, which was on his part no work of supererogation, but because “Schubert” seems from Pearl’s account to be an unlucky name, and we think it is time to experiment on something different. It is desired to commemorate the memory of the dear departed, I would suggest that the bird be called “Carroll III”, in memory of Carroll II who killed him and of Carroll I who suggested his replacement. Besides if he should turn out to be a good signer as we all hope and desire, he should “carol” anyway. However

(Page 2)

this is only a suggestion, which may be taken for what it is worth. We all hope that you enjoyed your birthday and had all the company and the presents that you could enjoy. It is not many people that can celebrate 87 birthdays and enjoy them besides. But here’s wishing you still many happy returns. Eileen has written you most of the news and has told you how I have stopped swimming and why. This leaves me very little to add. But I will say that I had 75 swims in the lake since coming home and up to the time that they turned the water off. On two occasions last week the lake was frozen over all the way across and I had to break the ice. This, however, I could do with my hands as it was not very thick. My last swim in the lake was on the 22nd. Since then I have taken to the bath tub like a duck take to water. Financially, owing to the non-appearance of cheques, I am having pretty tough sledding just now, I haven’t had a cent of money since last Monday when I had five cents left over from Sunday. I ran out of tobacco last week and thought I would have to begin my Lenten fast rather early. In fact I did start on it for nearly a day; but Robert’s sharp eye took notice of my sorry situation and that night he brought me a package of tobacco when he came home from work. Bonnie also took pity and got me another one. So I am all set again and puffing away as usual. Herman sent in a barrel of cider last week and this afternoon we siphoned it into my barrels. So now I am pretty well provided for for the winter thanks to my boys.

(Page 3)

I think on the whole I have a pretty fine family – one that is pretty hard to beat and of which I may particularly feel proud. Carolus and Marge are here now on their return from visiting their new house, which they go up to see every day. It hasn’t progressed very far as yet, only the hole being dug and the cribbing put in; but it is naturally very interesting to them. To-morrow the workers will pour in the cement. I never had the pleasure of watching the building of my own home, and can therefore scarcely estimate the interest they would have in the progress from “a” to “izzard” of its construction. Mrs. Froats, Dean Froats’ wife, while on a visit to her home for the funeral of her sister, met with an accident falling down the stairs backward and broke her right shoulder blade and fractured the vertebra back of the neck, and is in a very serious condition. Dean Froats was away all last week, but returned yesterday. I doubt whether she will ever recover from this accident. If she does, she will probably be more or less helpless the rest of her days. Eileen has told you of the deer meat we had for dinner to-day. It was the meat of a young deer and was as tender as chicken and very delicious. Bonnie’s eyes are not much better. Dr. Zwick gave her some tablets, which ease the pain for a time; but otherwise they have had little effect. He did one good thing, however, and that was, that he disabused her of the idea that her trouble came from her fall. He

(Page 4)

told her most emphatically that such an idea was “damn nonsense”. He thinks as I do that her trouble is largely due to the nervous condition due to the stage of life which she has now reached. In that case, she should be better by and by. Well, I have no other news and so I will bring my scrawl to a close and write you again next week if my stamps hold out. With love to you all and all good wishes,

I am

As ever

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, November 24, 1935


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on November 24, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, swimming in Silver Lake, Bonnie's eyesight, the new house that Carolus and Marguerite and building and Mrs. Froats' accident.