Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, October 13, 1935


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on October 13, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, swimming in Silver Lake, the children, and the upcoming federal election.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Mackenzie Harris in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Oct. 13, 1935
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.37.10
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Oct. 13, 1935.

Dear Mother:

I have had my dinner and have had my nap, and now before I begin anything else, like horseshoe for instance, I will endeavour to spin out my letter to you. I don’t have much news, it is true; but a letter without news is perhaps better than none at all, and I don’t intend to forsake you as long as the Lord gives me ability to think and strength to write. This may not be long, as I am getting up in years, as you very well know. This morning Arthur and I went down to Kitchener to First English for Church, and heard Rev. Jacobi, one of my former students, who at present is Pastor of that congregation. He preached a fine sermon, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I wish I could hear him every Sunday instead of our incumbent, I will not say ‘incompetent’ pastor. We are having to-day the most ideal weather of any day since we came home from the South. Up to to-day it has been constantly and consistently cool, with heavy frost every morning and ice in the puddles; but this morning as I went before breakfast for my daily swim, it was like ‘the good old summer time’, and I splashed the waters of the lake with great glee and coming out took a sun-bath, which was both soothing and invigorating in the superlative

(Page 2)

degree. Everything is so beautiful now with the autumnal colouring which nature puts on the trees and other foliage to perfection. I am enclosing a little envelope full of leaves to give you some idea of it all; though it will not give you the full effect as it loses in brilliancy through the desiccating process. We have now passed almost the first month of our work in the school; and I think I can truthfully say that so far I have enjoyed it more than ever before. There has not been a ruffle so far on the smooth surface of the waves of the school. If only the financial situation were better, we might all be quite happy. But perfection of happiness or of anything else for that matter is not attainable here below. And perhaps it is well ,as otherwise we might not want to go to heaven, which would be a disappointment to our gracious Lord. Bonnie has been wanting to write to you all and honestly intends to do so; but she is so taken up with her work that I have a great job to get her to bed even after 11 o’clock, and no time is left for other things. Last night she started to write to one of you – I don’t know which one it was – and when she got three lines done Herman came in for supper bringing a friend or two with him; and after that was over she wrote three more lines when Mrs. Hirtle (Roy and Seward’s mother) came in to call and stayed a long time. Then it was too late for her to finish her letters, and she called it off as a bad job. And so it happens continually. So if none of you get any letters, you will know what is the matter and will not blame a busy woman. I think

(Page 3)

I am busy myself when I get down to working out exegesis or some other theological lecture; but I fully confess that I cannot hold a candle to my ‘better half’. Besides it would be dangerous to do so. You may draw your own inference as to whether it would be dangerous to me or to her. Carolus and Marge come up every day or so, and frequently stay for a meal. They seem to prefer coming here to going to Marge’s parents, whom they visit only occasionally. Marion’s “Howey” comes practically every night and they either stay here or go to a show or somewhere. They seem to belong together and stick closer than a pea to its pod. Herman, they say, has a girl, but doesn’t have much time for her. He gets to bed too late and out of bed too late too. Little Frederick is as sweet and bright as ever. He never leaves for school without telling his mother goodbye and if he should forget it he always runs back and starts again. To-morrow is Dominion Election day. We think we are going to turn the Tories out and put the Liberals (who correspond to the Democrats of pre-Roosevelt times) in. The issue is somewhat complicated owing to the large number of parties putting candidates in the field, but we hope that King will have a majority over all. He will get five votes out of this household and should get six, but Arthur, who has just come of age, did not see to it that his name got on the polling list. Monday promises to be a day of great excitement in the Dominion.

(Page 4)

Since I have got down to politics, which is proverbially dirty, I think I had better stop, or I might wind up with something worse, if such a thing is possible. We all hope that you are keeping well and enjoying life in your own quiet way in the soft setting sunshine of life’s glowing evening. May God bless you!

With love as ever, I am

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, October 13, 1935


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on October 13, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little discusses the weather, swimming in Silver Lake, the children, and the upcoming federal election.