Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, September 15, 1935


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on September 15, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little thanks his mother for her hospitality during his recent visit to North Carolina.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Lindsay Bell in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Sept. 15, 1935
Image Dimensions:
Image Width: 21cm
Image Height: 28cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.37.8
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    fltLatitude: 43.4668
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to Canadian law. No restrictions on use.
Recommended Citation:
Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Sept. 15, 1935.

Dear Mother:

It has just been a week to-day since we arrived home, and here I am again writing you to-night as though nothing had happened; and our recent visit to you, so enjoyable and so happy seems like a sweet dream of the night. I thank the Lord with all my heart for His goodness and grace in permitting me to see you again and to enjoy once more your sweet companionship; and I am thankful also that in His providence He preserved you in so fine a state of health that you too were able to enjoy our visit and take pleasure in our company. You know that with all my affection for the rest of the family, home would not be home without my dear mother in it and I could not help but feel that something was lacking. It is my earnest prayer that the Lord may see fit to preserve your life from some years yet to come and that the visit just past may not be the last one that we will make to you. I will never forget your kind act in bringing me the pillow to make my old grey head more comfortable, just as though I were your own little child again; nor will I forget your sweet face as I saw it when we were

(Page 2)

moving away on the train. May God bless you! Bonnie and I can never thank you all sufficiently for the splendid time you all gave us on our 27th anniversary, the most wonderful trip in our lives and the most satisfying. It seems that no trouble was too great for you people to show us a good time; and you yourself were such a good old sport. We thank you a thousand times!

I have been quite busy this past week collecting in supplementary examination fees and making acknowledgements to the many relatives and friends who showed us so many and so great favours. I wrote sixteen letters during the past week. Among these I wrote to Aunt Claudia and Aunt Cari. I addressed Aunt Claudia as Mrs. Claudia Sullivan, Ninth Ave, Hickory, N.C., and I presume she will get it. As I said in my last letter, I didn’t know the number of her house or whether she went by the name of Henderson or of Sullivan. But if she hasn’t got it when you receive this, have her inquire at the post office where she should get it. Apart from the immediate family I also wrote to Uncle Ceph, to Aldis Henderson, to the two Guses (Gus Little & Gus Zelzer), to Walter Hahn and to John Miller. Since I wrote to so many I think it would be superfluous, sort of flipperty-flop as it were, for me to send a piece to the paper. So I think I will give the Hickory Daily Record a rest this time. You should have seen how happy the children were on our return home last week. Little Frederick’s face fairly flashed for joy and his beautiful eyes all beaming with joy. He is such an affectionate child anyway.

(Page 3)

Last night he crawled in bed with Bonnie and said to her: “Mother give me a kiss; you didn’t give me a single solitary kiss all day” – which was quite an unexpected speech for so young a youngster. It is needless to say that he got what he wanted. Bonnie and the older children are all down at Church tonight, and I am left alone with the double F’s. Frederick is in the kitchen writing a letter to Aunt Pearl. He first asked me to whom I was writing; and as I was writing to you he didn’t want Pearl to be left out in the cold. He is a chip off the old block, and is very considerate.

I have decided to drop my term insurance policy in the Metropolitan and take out a straight life policy with the Mutual. In order to do this I must furnish proof of my age. I am therefore enclosing a form with the request that you sign it and forward it to me without delay, as I must have it before the 25th. The places that you are to sign are indicated by a cross. Herbert can look after of the declaration in the lower left hand corner.

Tomorrow morning our registration begins; and I hope I will be able to handle a lot of money. Otherwise the year will be pretty hopeless. The Seminary will open on Tuesday and regular lectures will begin the following day. I always dread starting, but this wears off as I get well into the harness.

We are having fine fall weather now, though it is cool enough for a little fire in the furnace.

(Page 4)

Bonnie intends to write to all you people, but she is so busy that it is hard to say when her good intentions will be transformed into actions. She has been quite well and happy since her return, though she is suffering from a couple nasty felons on her fingers which seriously impede her in her work. She joins me most heartily in sending love to you all. She says she is glad she married me, or she never would have had that trip; and she is so much taken with the South and the Southern people that she would like to live there forever, or at least as long as the Lord would allow. But I must close for this time. With hearty greetings and all good wishes, I am

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

P.S. I find that Frederick’s letter was to you after all. Like a woman he changed his mind. CHL

Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, September 15, 1935
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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, September 15, 1935


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on September 15, 1935. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter, Little thanks his mother for her hospitality during his recent visit to North Carolina.