Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, January 17, 1932


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on January 17, 1932. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. Little discusses the weather, Bonnie's plan to sell the piano to buy more furniture, and updates about the Carolus and Marion.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.


Letter transcribed by Nicole Stumpf in 2017 for DH300 - Digital Humanities: Digital Editing and Publishing.
Date of Original:
Jan. 17, 1932
Dimensions:
Width: 21.5 cm
Height: 28 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.34.1
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Carroll Herman Little letter, 23 January 1921, Carroll Herman Little fonds, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections, Wilfrid Laurier University
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc15
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

{The Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada

Waterloo, ONT.}

177 Albert Street,

January 17, 1932.

Dear Mother:

This afternoon I will endeavor to write you a few lines again. I preached at Bridgeport this morning, walking down and back. The weather was bad. It rained all night last night, turned cold toward morning and ice covered the road and all trees and everything else that was visible and exposed. It was a sight for sore eyes and resembled the picture that I am enclosing except for the absence of snow. However, this afternoon the temperature moderated and all the ice is now again off the trees, the fences, the fields and the telephone wires; and the temperature is quite moderate. I don’t think we have ever had a January so free from snow. The snow fences have had absolutely nothing to do this winter, the ice has entirely gone out of the lake, the placid waters of which invite to a swim, of which I have taken advantage a time or two. The weatherman, in sympathy with the world in general, seems to have turned topsey-turvey, or something else. There is not much news for me to write about this time. In the seminary we have just completed the first semester work; and beginning this week, we will hold the mid-year examinations. I have all

(Page 2)

my examination papers made out, and will let the students do the work this week. I understand that one of the criticisms that Miss D. Morkley had to offer was that the professors both in seminary and college did practically all the work, while the students were more or less interested listeners. But that was due to the fact that she happened to strike lecture periods only. Bonnie is writing a letter to Pearl to-day. She may or may not have told of her condition. For the past few days she has had a very bad cold and coughs for long periods at a time. This sets her back some what and has its effect upon her nerves. Dr. Zwicks wants to see her again and I will take her down there probably sometime this week. The long siege has had its effect upon her spirits, which in consequence are usually quite low. She advertised her piano last week for sale. Three parties came and looked it over, but none of them bit. The price asked was $100, which I think was quite reasonable. But it is a hard thing to sell pianos just now. Bonnie’s idea was to sell the piano and with the proceeds invest in a Chesterfield set. She thinks, and perhaps is she right, that all our furniture is wearing out and going to pot, and is anxious to get in something new. The piano is about the only thing we have to sacrifice, and as we are unable to give any of the children lesson and it is only an ornament, there seems to be no reason why it should not be exchanged for a more useful ornament. As a matter of fact, we haven’t had enough money to have it tuned in the last five years or so. So when she decided to sell it, I

(Page 3)

had no objections to offer. But I doubt if a sale will be effected. This year has been particularly hard on us on account of expenses incidental to Bonnie’s illness. I usually depended on the $5 from Bridgeport to meet current expenses. But at their annual meeting they decided to pay only twice a month, and I find it much harder to make $10 last two than to make $5 last a week. It looks like it should amount to the same thing, but in practice it doesn’t. Carolus is still without work, but is beginning to do a little business in the picture line. This, however, even at best will only keep him in a little spending money. He wasted too much when he did have a good job; and now he is minus a car, minus clothes and pretty nearly everything else that is necessary. We also miss the nominal sum of $2.00 a week that we charged him for board. Enclosed he is sending you a picture of Marguerite and one of himself and Marguerite in a more or less compromising position. They seem to be quite happy together and Marguerite doesn’t seem to mind that he is out of a job. Herman hasn’t seen his girl since she left for Toronto , but hears from her quite regularly. Marion and “Howy” meet two or three times a week and get to a show or somewhere. But I must close for this time. With love and all good wishes, I am

As ever

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, January 17, 1932


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on January 17, 1932. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. Little discusses the weather, Bonnie's plan to sell the piano to buy more furniture, and updates about the Carolus and Marion.