Letter from C. H.Little to Candace Little, December 27, 1924


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on December 27, 1924. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario.

In this letter, Little describes the family's Christmas celebrations, including the tree, presents and dinner. He also describes the Kitchener-Waterloo community Christmas celebration which featured a parade, tree, and the distribution of 2,000 Christmas stockings.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of Concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Michael Skelton July 2013.
Date of Original:
Dec. 27, 1924
Dimensions:
Width: 21.5 cm
Height: 28 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
RG-102.13_1.26.23
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Carroll Herman Little letter, 27 December 1924, Carroll Herman Little fonds, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections, Wilfrid Laurier University
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc16
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

{Lutheran Theological Seminary and Waterloo College Waterloo, Ont.,} Dec. 27, 1924.

Dear Mother:

As I am going to Brantford early to-morrow morning and will not get back till late to-morrow night, I will write you my weekly letter to-night. In the first place allow me to thank you most heartily for the very generous contribution toward our Christmas cheer. As my cheque had not as yet arrived your $10 came in for immediate use and enabled me to do considerable in the way of providing presents for the family. Soon after your letter arrived the other letters of which you gave intimation began to come in. Bikle sent a cheque for $50 – a most extraordinary present. I have heard of only one other like it and that came to Dr. Potter from his mother. Clarence sent me $10, Herbert $10 and Mabel and Pearl each $5. Of this I applied $70 on my stove and intended to put it all toward that in a month or so. But as I had run up several bills on Christmas presents I thought it best to pay them off first. My purchases along this line were a little heavier than usual due to the fact that some of the children wanted useful presents. Herman and Arthur for example had their hearts set on violins. And while I got them only beginners instruments they cost about $7 apiece. Herman and Arthur have been anxious for some time to take up violin and said they would practice if I should get them. Robert wanted a Bible of his own, and as I liked to encourage this

(Page 2)

trait of character I got him a very nice for $4.00. Marion had to have a pair of shoes and skates which cost over $5.00. Then there were presents for the little ones, and for Bonnie, and candies and nuts and Christmas tree trimmings, etc – all of which took money. I have written to Bikleˊ and Clarence and Herbert thanking them for their generosity and considerate thoughtfulness. I take this opportunity of thanking Pearl and Mabel most heartily for their kind and liberal gifts. I should write them personally but am not sure whether Mabel is still at home or not, and besides I have had so many gifts and greetings to answer that I cannot get around to any more this week, especially in view of preaching twice to-morrow. It seems to me that I have a wonderfully fine lot of brothers and sisters, and I am quite proud of them all. Bonnie gave me a present that I appreciate more than anything else. She slipped off your fine photograph for a few days before Christmas and had a nice frame put on it. As she has excellent taste the frame brings out the picture gracefully. I have my good kind mother’s face now always in front of me as I sit at my desk and read or write or work. It will also preserve the picture so that it will always keep nice. We had a fine Christmas tree at home, lighted it up on Christmas eve and had a little service and distributed the gifts. Carolus presided ably at the piano. When Herman and Arthur learn to play the violin we will have quite an orchestra here. The children remembered me with cigars, so that from Christmas to date I have had plenty to smoke and when that became dry I drew on the cellar for liquid refreshments. The Community Christmas tree on

(Page 3)

the afternoon of Dec. 24th was a grand affair. The tree which was one of the most symmetrical I ever saw was beautifully decorated. Santa Claus arrived in his big red sled drawn by grey horses and Cinderella came in her car or big float, while clowns on horses, real and imitation made fun for the crowds. Some 2000 stockings well-filled were distributed, of which we received six. On Christmas morning I attended early service (8 o’clock) at St. John’s. I did not attend any of the Sunday School or children’s celebrations. They occurred in the evening and that is Bonnie’s time. So I left it to her and without any regrets as I always find them more or less tiresome. On Christmas day I finished reading my N.T. through for the 16th time this year – the 103rd since I have been keeping record. We had a big goose for Christmas dinner. It weighed 13 lbs. and to give you an idea of the healthy condition of the family, we consumed it all but the bones at the one meal. We have had real winter weather all through the holidays, at times exceedingly cold and very windy. To-day, however, the wind died down and though the temperature was not much higher we didn’t feel it so much. I kept the house warm - almost hot, but have used a lot of coal in the last week. The children are all enjoying their vacation and the Christmas holidays and are as happy as larks and as noisy as crows. But I must close. Wishing you all a blessed and bright New Year,

I am

Most Sincerely yours,

[signed] Carroll H. Little

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Letter from C. H.Little to Candace Little, December 27, 1924


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on December 27, 1924. Little describes family life with wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a Lutheran pastor and faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario.

In this letter, Little describes the family's Christmas celebrations, including the tree, presents and dinner. He also describes the Kitchener-Waterloo community Christmas celebration which featured a parade, tree, and the distribution of 2,000 Christmas stockings.