Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, February 3, 1919


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on February 3, 1919. Little describes family life with his wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter Little discusses ice skating on the lake in Waterloo Park. He also describes Nils Willison's move into a Seminary house, and the working environment at the Seminary.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.

Letter transcribed by Michael Skelton in 2012.
Date of Original:
February 3,1919
Dimensions:
Width: 16.2 cm
Height: 25.7 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
U242_1.21.5
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Carroll Herman Little letter, 3 February 1919, Carroll Herman Little fonds, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections, Wilfrid Laurier University
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc9
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Waterloo, Ont.,

Feb’y 3, 1919.

Dear Mother:

I intended to write to you last night, but I had to preach last evening in St. John’s Church and when I got home I felt too tired to write. My preaching came about in this way: Pastor Bockelmann and Pastor Maurer had arranged to exchange but toward the end of the week Pastor Maurer took sick and telephoned me Saturday to take the service for him in St. John’s. It was sort of short notice, but I couldn’t refuse under the circumstances and filled the bill as well as I could. We always have to hold ourselves in readiness for emergencies here. Yesterday was Feb’y 2nd candlemas bear, badger, or groundhog day, as you like it. There was no doubt about the varmint’s seeing his shadow yesterday as it was from beginning to end one of the brightest days we have had this winter and withal very mild. To-day has followed in its footsteps and is still milder. The little snow that lies in patches here and there

(Page 2)

is thawing and the ice is melting just like in the spring. I don’t think I ever saw a winter like this in Canada. It is a great saving on the coal file. We will probably get some cold weather yet but it will not be for a very long stretch. Saturday was a fairly cold day but bright. I took the children down to the lake for a skate. Marion and Arthur were along but of course didn’t skate. They enjoyed walking on the ice, however, and are looking forward to getting skates next winter. Carolus is quite an acrobat on skates and does all sorts of stunts, such as skating backwards, jumping, skating on one foot or with his hands between his legs or crossed behind his neck etc. He can beat me on the stunt racket. Herman tries them too but it more liable to fall than Carolus. Still he is a good skater. As I had to preach last night I didn’t get out yesterday afternoon, but the boys had a try at it. Herman is better at mesmorising than Carolus and can get up his psalm in about half the time. This is surprising as Carolus is ordinarily much quicker of action than Herman. Last Friday I had a call from the Heinzmann firm in Kitchener and the representative told me that my piano was in worse shape

(Page 3)

than they supposed and that they could not fix it in Kitchener but would have to send it to the factory and that the cost would be about $200. I went down to Kitchener and looked into the matter and the outcome was the purchase of a new piano. They allowed me $275 for the old piano and I bought a fine Gerhard Heinzmann piano in Walnut case for $500, on $225 and the old piano. The new piano is a very fine instrument, in mechanical construction and tone superior to my old one. It is a pretty hard proposition for me to pay for a second piano, but it was the only thing to be done. The carter who damaged mine has gone to California and there is no chance of getting any more out of him. I have been given good time in which to pay for the new piano, however, and hope to get through with it in time. Bonnie is well pleased with the new instrument though she hasn’t yet got used to the difference in the case. If the man the Heinzmanns sent out here to examine the old piano had hone his work more thoroughly and had acted straight in the matter I might have got more damages out of the carter, but I would probably have had to sue for it with all the annoyance that entails. So I suppose it will be just as well as it is in the long run. We have my old house sufficiently ad-

(Page 4)

vanced to permit the Willison's moving into the front part of it this week. The house has been papered anew throughout, the floors painted and varnished and everything fixed up in tip top shape. It is far too nice for the Willisons and the sort of furniture they have to put in it. What they have was never good in the first place and hasn’t improved any by use but is rather now in a high state of dilapidation. Prof. Willison is not a man that I could ever like, but he is conscientious in his work and we get along all right. Prof. Lincke is having the time of his life. Dr. Laury kept him under his thumb and wouldn’t allow him any privileges or even to form a German Literary Society and criticized him on every occasion to the students, while I have treated him white. He has his limitations as a teacher but is in many ways a very decent fellow and deserves to be treated with consideration. The Board expressed themselves at their last meeting as highly gratified at the different spirit prevailing in the institution. If we get Prof. Zinck here next year as a full fledged professor we will be in position to go ahead and make greater progress than ever. But I must close for this time. With much love to you all, I am

Most Sincerely yours

[signed] C. H. Little

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, February 3, 1919


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother, Candace Little, on February 3, 1919. Little describes family life with his wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a faculty member at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada in Waterloo, Ontario. In this letter Little discusses ice skating on the lake in Waterloo Park. He also describes Nils Willison's move into a Seminary house, and the working environment at the Seminary.