Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, December 25, 1917


Description
Creators:
Little, Carroll Herman, Correspondent
Little, Candace
, Recipient
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Correspondence
Description:
Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother Candace Little on December 25, 1917. Little describes family life with his wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a professor at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada. Discusses the results of the federal election, conscription, suffrage, A. A. Zink's ordination, and the coal shortage.
Notes:
Carroll Herman Little (1872-1958) was a Lutheran pastor, and a professor and administrator at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario.

Little was born in Hickory, North Carolina in 1872. He was the eldest of ten children born to Rev. Marcus Lafayette Little (1848-1891) and Candace Mary Almetta Herman (1848-1947). Marcus L. Little, a Lutheran pastor and educator, was killed in a train accident in Newton, North Carolina on February 16, 1891.

C. H. Little received his early education and work experience in North Carolina, graduating from Gaston College in 1889. From 1888-1891 Little worked as editor of a newspaper founded by his father in Dallas, North Carolina. He also taught in North Carolina schools. After his father’s death, Little entered Roanoke College in Virginia, graduating with a BA (Classics) in 1893. From 1897-1898 he was enrolled in post-graduate studies in the Classics Department at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

In 1901 Little graduated from Mount Airy Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Following in his father’s footsteps, C. H. Little was ordained by the Ministerium of Pennsylvania on June 3, 1901. After ordination he accepted a call to the Nova Scotia Synod, serving as pastor in the New Germany parish from 1901-1909, and the Mahone Bay parish from 1909-1911. From 1911-1914 he was housefather of Bethany Orphans’ Home in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia. During this time he also served the Nova Scotia Synod as secretary (1904-1909), president (1911-1914) and editor of the Nova Scotia Lutheran (1907-1911). In 1914 Little was recognized with an honorary Doctor of Divinity from Lenoir Rhyne College in Hickory, North Carolina. Little left Nova Scotia in 1914 when he accepted a call to the St. Lawrence Parish in Morrisburg, Ontario.

In 1917 C. H. Little accepted a teaching position at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada (now Waterloo Lutheran Seminary) in Waterloo, Ontario. He remained at the Seminary for the rest of his career, retiring in 1947. In addition to his responsibilities as professor, Little also held various administrative roles including acting President, 1918-1920, 1929-1931, and 1942-44; Bursar, 1918-1933; and Dean, 1920-1927. Little continued to pursue his own education through correspondence studies with the Chicago Lutheran Seminary, receiving the degrees of BD and STM in 1924, and an STD in 1928.

Publications authored by C. H. Little include New Testament handbook (1941), Lutheran confessional theology : a presentation of the doctrines of the Augsburg Confession and the Formula of concord (1943) and Explanation of the book of Revelation (1950). He was a long time contributor to the Canada Lutheran, and held editorial positions for the publication.

Carroll Herman Little married Edith Blanche “Bonnie” DeLong (1888-1974) on September 9, 1908 in Nova Scotia. They had ten children: Carolus DeLong, Herman Luther, Marion, Arthur Bernard, Robert Paul, Margaret Eileen, Ruth, Catharine, Florence, and John Frederick.

Carroll Herman Little died in Waterloo, Ontario on March 31, 1958.


Letter transcribed by Michael Skelton in 2012.
Date of Original:
Dec. 25, 1917
Dimensions:
Width: 20 cm
Height: 26 cm
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
U242_1.19.6
Collection:
Carroll Herman Little fonds
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.4668 Longitude: -80.51639
Copyright Statement:
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation:
Carroll Herman Little letter, 25 December 1917, Carroll Herman Little fonds, Wilfrid Laurier University Archives & Special Collections, Wilfrid Laurier University
Reproduction Notes:
U242 Disc8
Contact
Wilfrid Laurier University Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3C5

Full Text

Waterloo, Ont.,

Dec. 25, 1917

Dean Mother:-

Your short letter with it generous enclosure was received yesterday morning. In view of the hard times we certainly did not expect anything of the kind and I feel that you did more than you should have done. But we thank you very heartily just the same. Bonnie and I went over to Kitchener yesterday afternoon and did some shopping. We got quite a few things and I can hardly tell you for what your money went. We bought some nice new sweaters for the three oldest boys. I bought a pair of gloves and a pair of shoes for Bonnie and she bought me a pair of gloves. Aside from nuts, oranges and candies etc we didn’t buy anything else much yesterday. However, largely with the money father DeLong sent we bought a toboggan for Carolus, a set of chairs and table for Marion, a construction outfit for Herman, a rocking horse for Arthur and a toy for Robert. But as Minnie and Meda sent each of the children a nice Christmas gift they were well supplied and are spending to-day a very enjoyable and happy Christmas. Pastor Behrens and his family with the exception of Mrs. Behrens were out this

(Page 2)

morning and the children had a great time especially with the toboggan. There is a grand place to use it in the back yard where it runs down the terrace into and across our sunken garden. We had mild weather nearly all last week and the snow is nearly all gone, but there is enough in the rear of the house for good sliding. To-day is bright and very cold again. Pastor Behrens held his Christmas service at 6 o’clock this morning. I had to get up at half-past four to get shaved and get ready for the car which left here at twenty to six. He had a large congregation out, estimated at 200. And he preached a long sermon of nearly an hour. From Saturday till yesterday morning we had the pleasure of Pastor Maurer’s company. He came over for the ordination of student Zinck. He is looking quite sprucy since he married his new wife and seems to be as happy as a lark. In Mrs. M[?] he has a very fine wife – quite superior I think in every way to his first one. I had the honor of preaching Mr. Zinck’s ordination sermon on Sunday night and also in assisting in the ordination. There was a large congregation present and I think I gave them one of my best sermons. I preached from 1Cor. 4:1-2. I think our action in ordaining Mr. Zinck will save him to the Church and secure his exception from military service. It

(Page 3)

would be a shame to take a man of his education and capabilities and put him to stopping bullets in a trench – a thing which the most ignorant and unlettered could do as well and especially when he is so much needed in our work. Since the election has resulted as it has it will be very difficult for young men who are drafted to secure exemption. I did not lose my vote. The man I voted for was elected in this riding by a majority of nearly 2500 and carried every polling precinct in the riding. However, the party lost out in the Dominion as I feared it would. Everything was against them . The election law disfranchising the naturalized German citizens and enfranchising the women relatives of soldiers made the result almost a foregone conclusion. And when the Government toward the end of the campaign promised exemption to laborers on the farm, whether drafted or not, it made a practical certainty still more certain. But the people have voted it and as I said before, they deserve all that is coming to them in the conscription line. And no doubt they will get it. Already I hear it is proposed within a few months to put the country on rations and bread tickets and I think our hardest times are yet to come. The women enfranchised, viz soldiers’ mothers, wives and daughters and sisters, were

(Page 4)

much more fanatical than the men. I never was in favor of woman’s suffrage anyway and I am more concerned of the error of it now than ever. It will not help in the slightest toward pacifict policies or anything else that’s worth while.

I think before another year is over we are going to face the hardest and most difficult times that America (including Canada) has ever encountered. With the present trend I don’t see how it can be otherwise. So far, apart from the high prices, we are not suffering except locally from the scarcity of coal. I have so far been able to get a half ton at a time by the time I ran out. I don’t know though whether this will continue or not. It was on account of lack of coal that Dr. Laury had to forgo running the College through the holidays. Neither the College nor the Seminary will open now before Jany 3. This will give me a good rest – not that I particularly need it, but still I don’t mind having it. In spite of the fact that I hardly ever get to bed before half-past eleven and often 12 o’clock, I don’t feel nearly as tired as I did in the pastorate and my physical condition is practically perfect. I received yesterday a little box of ten fine cigars from one of my former parishioners at Morrisburg. Bonnie also received a tatted centerpiece as a present. To-night the boys have their concert at St. John’s and to-morrow night Pastor Behren’s S.S. will hold forth. I can’t write any more at present. Wishing you all the joys of the season and the richest blessing of the Saviour born this day, I am Sincerely yours

[signed] Carroll H. Little

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Letter from C. H. Little to Candace Little, December 25, 1917


Handwritten letter from Carroll Herman Little to his mother Candace Little on December 25, 1917. Little describes family life with his wife Bonnie and their children, and his work as a professor at the Evangelical Lutheran Seminary of Canada. Discusses the results of the federal election, conscription, suffrage, A. A. Zink's ordination, and the coal shortage.