Blind River Digital Collection
Huron (Beavertail) Style Snowshoes
Description
Creator
Blind River origin
Media Type
Object
Description
This style of snowshoes have many different names including, Huron, Michigan, Maine, Beavertail or Algonquine. With very intricate webbing of sinew, they indicate First Nation manufacture.

They are basically a tear drop shape and are particularly useful for trails, open woods and rolling terrain. They are not so useful in deep powdery snow or thick wooded areas. Larger than most, they were probably used for carrying heavy loads.
Notes
Traditional snowshoes are made of a hard wood, usually ash. The webbing material is rawhide, which is strips of denuded animal skin. The animal from which the webbing material was retrieved was traditionally moose, deer, or caribou.
Subject(s)
Personal Name(s)
Transferred fromo the Jordan Museum in Jordan, Ontario.
Collection
Timber Village Museum
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 46.18336 Longitude: -82.95817
Contact
Timber Village Museum
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

180 Leacock St. P.O. Box 628

Blind River, ON P0R 1B0

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Huron (Beavertail) Style Snowshoes


This style of snowshoes have many different names including, Huron, Michigan, Maine, Beavertail or Algonquine. With very intricate webbing of sinew, they indicate First Nation manufacture.

They are basically a tear drop shape and are particularly useful for trails, open woods and rolling terrain. They are not so useful in deep powdery snow or thick wooded areas. Larger than most, they were probably used for carrying heavy loads.