Blind River Digital Collection
Blind River History Told By Bill and Mrs. Floss Spiessman, Circa 1974
:
Description
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Documents
Description
This is a three page interview summary about how Mr. Speissman came to Blind River to cook in a lumber camp, and about life without modern conveniences.
Notes
Mr. Speissman describes various transportation methods including taking a tugboat up the Blind River,a steel train to Lake Matinenda and then an alligator (skow) to 68 Bay where he cooked in a lumber camp.
Date of Original
Circa 1974
Subject(s)
Local identifier
geneology
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 46.18336 Longitude: -82.95817
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Blind River Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

8 Woodward Avenue

P.O. Box 880

Blind River, ON P0R 1B0

(705) 356-7616

Full Text

BLIND RIVER HISTORY

Mrs. Floss Spiessman

Mr. Bill Spiessman

Bill Spiessman was born in a community called Bloomingdale near Kitchener, Ontario in 1880. His parents were of German ancestry which accounts for his surname. There were five children in the family of which only one is alive today where he has made his home in Edmonton.

Bill's father had been a lumberman, then he moved his family to South River where he bought a farm. Bill went to high school in Minnesota, U.S. but did not complete his studies. Instead, he moved to blind River in 1903 to become a cook for the Cook brothers in their lumbering camps. Until 1908, the American hotel on the site where St. Mary's separate School is now situated became his home when Bill was not in the bush.

He met a young lady , Floss Dunbar whose home was in Kinmount, Ontario, and married her on October 5, 1910. The wedding ceremony and reception were both in the bride's house in Kinmount. After a short honeymoon the couple moved back to Blind River. Bill returned to cooking in the camps where Floss could go with him.

Six years after they were married Bill bought a house in town, next to the present funeral home, Floss no longer went to the camps as some of her family came to live with her and later her two children made it necessary for her to stay in town where they could attend school.

Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.

thumbnail








Blind River History Told By Bill and Mrs. Floss Spiessman, Circa 1974


This is a three page interview summary about how Mr. Speissman came to Blind River to cook in a lumber camp, and about life without modern conveniences.