Blind River Digital Collection
Amy Poucette Remembers, Blind River, The Standard,1986


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DAYS GONE BY Oct.5 - 1986

Amy Poucette remembers

By HELEN GAJKEWSKI Standard staff writer

When Amy Poucette was born in Agawa Bay in 1901. she took her mother by surprise. Her mother was preparing a dinner for a visiting priest and doctor when Mrs. Poucette decided it was time for her grand entrance.

Since her untimely beginning, Mrs. Poucette has seen and done a number of interesting things. The long-time Blind River resident worked as postmistress of the Spragge post office for a while, married and had five children, picnicked along the Serpent River and was given a cigarette by the king of England.

"I had the most wonderful experiences a girl could have," she said, sitting contentedly in her home on Indiana Ave.

Her father, Paul Dufour, was born in France. He worked as a cook in lumber camps along the North Shore. The family moved to Blind River when Mrs. Poucette was three. She remembers staying in the Grand View Hotel - where the 17 Restaurant is now - and which then had a wonderful view of Lake Huron.

As a young girl, Mrs. Poucette used to wait for the tugboat which travelled to lumber camps across the Blind River. Her father was a cook at one of the camps, and he used to bring home leftover pastries.

The family later moved to a farm near Lake Duborne. north of town. One day while walking to a neighbor's house with her mother and sister, a cat jumped on her back digging in its claws and hanging on, she said. "There was dancing and screaming and yelling with the cat on my back."

Her mother and sister couldn't get the cat off, and finally the neighbor's girl rescued her. She still has a scar and a dislike for the furry creatures, even though she has two cats living in her home now.

Mrs. Poucette remembers the day King Edward stopped at Blind River railway station. "He was very nice," she said. "He took out his cigarettes and passed them around to everyone. I still had mine when I moved back to Blind River. Finally it fell apart and I threw it out. I didn't take very good care of it."

She lived in Spragge for a few years before she married her husband of 64 years, John Poucette. She had been working at the Blind River post office after finishing high school, when she was offered the job as postmistress in Spragge.

PHOTO

Amy Poucette has many memories to ponder over as she sits in her kitchen in her Indiana Street home. She remembers her first day at high school, when she got to climb the stairs to the upper level of the school, leaving the young students behind. As the principal watched to make sure they walked like ladies and gentlemen she tripped down the stairs, she recalls.


Creator:
Helen Gajewski, Author
Media Type:
Text
Image
Item Type:
Clippings
Description:
This article is about some of the memories of Mrs. Amy Poucette's life in the Blind River area. She recalls King Edward's stop in Blind River and receiving a cigarette from him along with other bystanders. A photograph of an older Mrs. Poucette taken at her Blind River home accompanies this article.
Date of Original:
October 5, 1986
Subject(s):
Local identifier:
Local people
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 46.18336 Longitude: -82.95817
Copyright Statement:
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rightsholder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Blind River Public Library
Email
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

8 Woodward Avenue

P.O. Box 880

Blind River, ON P0R 1B0

(705) 356-7616

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Amy Poucette Remembers, Blind River, The Standard,1986


This article is about some of the memories of Mrs. Amy Poucette's life in the Blind River area. She recalls King Edward's stop in Blind River and receiving a cigarette from him along with other bystanders. A photograph of an older Mrs. Poucette taken at her Blind River home accompanies this article.